Author Topic: Weather In Canada 2019  (Read 11062 times)

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather In Canada 2019
« Reply #240 on: September 21, 2019, 12:56:19 AM »
Top weather events of the 20th century

    1900-1920
    1921-1940
    1941-1960
    1961-1980
    1981-1999

Top weather events from 1900-1920

Rogers Pass Avalanche - March 5, 1910. Sixty-two train men and labourers perished 2 km west of Rogers Pass, BC, when their engine was hit by an avalanche and hurtled 500 metres into Bear Creek. Over 600 volunteers used pick axes and shovels to dig through 10 m of snow in the search for survivors.

World's Worst Iceberg Accident - April 15, 1912. The unsinkable Titanic collided with an iceberg 700 km southeast of Newfoundland, causing the death of 1,500 people and making headlines around the world.

Deadliest Canadian Tornado - June 30, 1912. A late afternoon tornado slashed through six city blocks in Regina, killing up to 40 people, injuring 300 others, destroying 500 buildings and leaving a quarter of the population homeless. Better known as the "Regina Cyclone", the tornado lasted three minutes but it took 46 years to pay for the damages.

Black Sunday Storm - November 7-13, 1913. One of the most severe Great Lakes storms on record swept winds of 140 km/h over lakes Erie and Ontario, taking down 34 ships and 270 sailors. Days later, the crew of one ship was found lashed to the mast, frozen to death -- only the ship survived.

Storm Claims Sealers - April 1, 1914. Seventy-seven sealers froze to death during a violent storm on the ice off the southeast coast of Labrador. At the height of the storm, from March 31 to April 2, the temperature was -23°C with winds from the northwest at 64 km/h.

Fog Causes Ship Collision - May 29, 1914. Shallow river fog contributed to the collision of two ships -- the CP Liner Empress of Ireland and a Norwegian coal ship, The Storstad -- in the St. Lawrence River, 300 km seaward from Quebec City. The liner sank in 25 minutes, and 1,024 passengers lost their lives.

Victoria's Snowstorms of the Century - February 2, 1916 and December 28-29, 1996. Huge snowstorms, 80 years apart, clobbered Canada's "snow-free" city with more than 55 cm of snow. The December storm dropped 80 cm of snow in 24 hours, 125 cm in five days with cleanup costs exceeding $200 million (including a record insurance payout for BC of $80 million).

Killer Lightning - July 29, 1916. Lightning ignited a forest fire which burned down the towns of Cochrane and Matheson, Ontario, killing 233 people.

Princess Sophia Sinks off BC - October 23, 1918. A Canadian steamship carrying miners from Yukon and Alaska became stranded on Vanderbilt Reef. Rescuers were unable to remove the 268 passengers and 75 crewmen due to a strong northerly gale. The next day, weather conditions worsened and the ship sank killing all on board.

https://ec.gc.ca/meteo-weather/default.asp?lang=En&n=6A4A3AC5-1#tab1

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Re: Weather In Canada 2019
« Reply #241 on: September 22, 2019, 12:59:23 AM »
Canada Top weather events of the 20th century
Top weather events from 1921-1940
  • August Gale Kills 56 in Newfoundland - August 24-25, 1927. A hurricane swept through Atlantic Canada washing out roads, filling basements, and swamping boats. In Newfoundland, 56 people died at sea.
  • Multiple Tornadoes hit Southern Manitoba - June 22, 1922. Hot and humid air led to the development of several tornadoes in the area. Five deaths and hundreds of injuries were attributed to the event which caused $2 million in 1922 dollars.
  • Dustbowl Era - 1930s. Between 1933 and 1937, the Prairies experienced only 60% of its normal rainfall. Thousands of livestock were lost to starvation and suffocation, crops withered and 250,000 people across the region abandoned their land to seek better lives elsewhere.
  • Great Lakes Freighter Hit by Lightning - June 26, 1930. Lightning struck the bow of the John B. King drillship in the St. Lawrence River, igniting a store of dynamite onboard. The explosion killed 30 people and injured 11 others.
  • Ontario's Coldest Day on Record - December 29, 1933. Fourteen sites recorded their coldest-ever temperature, including Ottawa at -38.9°C and Algonquin Park at -45.0°C. Outside Ontario, record cold temperatures were also set in Manitoba, Quebec and Nova Scotia.
  • Cold Wave Grips Eastern North America - February 1934. A cold wave engulfed the continent from Manitoba to the Atlantic seaboard and down the east coast to Palm Beach, Florida. Ice trapped fishing vessels off Nova Scotia, hospitals were jammed with frostbite victims and, for only the second time in recorded history, Lake Ontario froze completely over.
  • Cold Wave Freezes Victoria and BC's Lower Mainland - January 19-29, 1935. Winter weather gripped Vancouver, with temperatures dipping to -16° and snowfall greater than 40 cm. While the extreme cold caused fuel shortages and frozen water supplies, a quick thaw followed by 267 mm of rain over the next four days added extensive roof damage across the city, including the collapse of the Forum -- the city's main hockey and curling rink.
  • The Deadliest Heat Wave in History - July 5-17, 1936. Temperatures exceeding 44°C in Manitoba and Ontario claimed 1,180 Canadians (mostly the elderly and infants) during the longest, deadliest heat wave on record. Four hundred of these deaths were caused by people who drowned seeking refuge from the heat. In fact, the heat was so intense that steel rail lines and bridge girders twisted, sidewalks buckled, crops wilted and fruit baked on trees.
  • Hottest Day on Record - July 5, 1937. The highest temperature ever recorded in Canada was reached at Midale and Yellowgrass, Saskatchewan when the mercury soared to 45°C.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2019, 01:10:30 AM by PaulMy »

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Re: Weather In Canada 2019
« Reply #242 on: September 23, 2019, 01:10:10 AM »
Canada Top weather events of the 20th century
Top weather events from 1941-1960
  • Eastern Ontario's Freezing Rain Storm - December 28-30, 1942. Ice "as thick as a person's wrist" covered telephone wires, trees and railway tracks. In Ottawa, 50,000 workers walked to work for five days. Because of the war, there were few men available to clear the streets and repair lines.
  • Toronto's Worst Single-Day Snowfall - December 11, 1944. A severe winter storm dumped 48 cm of snow on Toronto's downtown, while gale-force winds piled the snow into huge drifts. A total of 57.2 cm fell over two days. In all, 21 people died -- 13 from overexertion. Funerals were postponed, expectant mothers walked to hospitals, and there were no home deliveries of milk, ice or fuel. Of major concern, factories producing war ammunitions had to close temporarily.
  • Windsor's Killer Tornado - June 17, 1946. The third worst killer tornado in Canadian history reared up across the Detroit River, killing 17 people and demolishing or damaging 400 homes in Windsor and the surrounding county. The tornado also took down 150 barns and farm buildings, and uprooted hundreds of orchard trees and full-grown woodlots.
  • Worst Blizzard in Canadian Railway History - January 30 to February 8, 1947. A ten-day blizzard buried towns and trains from Winnipeg to Calgary, causing some Saskatchewan roads and rail lines to remain plugged with snow until spring. Children stepped over power lines to get to school and built tunnels to get to the outhouse. A Moose Jaw farmer had to cut a hole in the roof of his barn to get in to feed his cows.
  • Coldest Temperature in North America - February 3, 1947. The temperature in Snag, Yukon dipped to -63°C, establishing Canada's reputation for extreme cold.
  • BC's Worst Flood of the Century - May-June 1948. BC's Fraser River overflowed, drowning 10, inundating 22,200 hectares, destroying 2,300 homes and forcing 16,000 to flee. Row boats were the only means of transportation in much of the Fraser Valley, and for three weeks Vancouver had no rail connection with the rest of Canada.
  • Red River Flood - Spring 1950. Described as the greatest flood disaster in Canadian history, the Red River crested at 9.2 m above normal near Winnipeg. While 100,000 people were evacuated from Southern Manitoba, miraculously only one drowning was reported. Losses included damage to 5,000 homes and buildings, totaling $550 M in property losses. The Manitoba government decided to construct the Winnipeg Floodway to forestall future flooding.
  • First Person on Canadian Television - A Weatherperson! - September 8, 1954. Canadian television made its debut on this day, and meteorologist Percy Saltzman was the first person to appear on screen. Saltzman continued to present television weather for 22 years.
  • Hurricane Hazel - October 15, 1954. Leaving a nightmare of destruction , Hazel dumped an estimated 300 million tonnes of rain on Toronto, causing lost streets, washed out bridges and untold personal tragedy. In all, 83 people died -- some bodies washing up on the shores of Lake Ontario in New York State days later.
  • Deadly Snowstorm in St. John's - February 16, 1959. A snowstorm with strong winds created 7-metre drifts, blocking main streets and causing six casualties. Another 70,000 Newfoundlanders were left without power, crippled telephone service, and blocked highways, streets and railways. Scores of motorists spent the night at homes along the highways after drifts buried their stalled cars.
  • Fishing Fleet Disaster off Esuminac, NB - June 20, 1959. More than 30 fishermen drowned in the worst storm disaster ever to hit the Gulf of St. Lawrence fishing fleet. Twenty-two salmon boats sank by a sudden, smashing north-easterly gale.

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Re: Weather In Canada 2019
« Reply #243 on: September 24, 2019, 12:50:15 AM »
Canada Top weather events of the 20th century
Top weather events from 1961-1980
  • West Records Single Driest Year - 1961. Many areas in the drought-stricken Prairies received only 45% of normal precipitation. In Regina, every month but May was drier than normal, and for the 12-month crop year the precipitation total was the lowest ever. The duration, severity and size of the area effectively made this drought the worst on record. Losses in wheat production alone were $668 million, 30% more than in the previous worst year, 1936.
  • Typhoon Freda Hits BC's Lower Mainland - October 12, 1962. Remnants of Typhoon Freda struck BC's Lower Mainland, causing 7 deaths and damages in excess of $10 million. Twenty percent of Stanley Park was flattened. In Victoria, winds reached sustained speeds of 90 km/h with gusts to 145 km/h.
  • Violent Storm Strikes Maritimes - December 1-2, 1964. One of the most violent storms in years struck the Maritime provinces with gales reaching gust speeds of 160 km/h. Three fishing boats, including two large draggers, were lost in the storm accounting for the loss of 23 lives. Halifax and Charlottetown recorded their all-time lowest sea-level pressure ever.
  • "Great Blizzard" Lashes Southern Prairies - December 15, 1964. Heavy snows, accompanied by 90 km/h winds and -34°C temperatures, paralyzed the southern Prairies. Three people froze to death and thousands of animals perished.
  • Winnipeg's Snowstorm of the Century - March 4, 1966. This winter blizzard dropped 35 cm of snow with winds blowing at 120 km/h, paralyzing the city for two days. Winnipeg's mayor issued a warning for everyone to stay at home. The drifting snow blocked all highways in southern Manitoba and forced the cancellation of all air travel in and out of the Winnipeg airport.
  • Blizzards in Southern Alberta - April 17-20 and 27-29, 1967. A series of intense winter storms dropped a record 175 cm of snow on southern Alberta. Thousands of cattle, unable to forage for food in the deep snow, perished on the open range. Army units were dispatched to assist in snow clearing, while food, fuel and feed were airlifted into the province. The good news? The Revenue Minister announced that the income tax deadline for residents of southern Alberta was extended two weeks to May 15.
  • Greatest Rainfall in One Day - October 6, 1967. A one-day rainfall of 489.2 mm occurred at Ucluelet Brynnor Mines, BC - a Canadian weather record that still stands.
  • Montreal's Snowstorm of the Century - March 4, 1971. Montreal's worst snowstorm killed 17 people and dumped 47 cm of snow on the city with winds of 110 km/h producing second-storey drifts. Winds snapped power poles and felled cables, cutting electricity for up to ten days in some areas. In total, the city hauled away 500,000 truckloads of snow.
  • Crater in Quebec Opens During Rainstorm - May 4, 1971. Tragedy struck the village of St-Jean-Vianney, Quebec when heavy rains caused a sinkhole 600 m wide and 30 m deep to appear in a residential area. The crater/mudslide killed 31 people and swallowed up 35 homes, a bus and several cars.
  • Hurricane Beth Soaks Nova Scotia - August 15, 1971. Hurricane Beth brought punishing winds and up to 300 mm of rain, causing considerable crop damage and swamping highways and bridges, temporarily isolating communities on the eastern mainland of Nova Scotia. More rain fell during Beth than during Hazel in 1954.
  • One Cold Year - 1972. The only year on record when all weather-reporting stations in Canada reported temperatures below normal on an annual basis.
  • Another Killer Tornado in Windsor - April 3, 1974. Three hundred and twenty three people died when a series of tornadoes struck 11 states in the U.S. and Ontario within an eight-hour period. The tornadoes caused more than $1 billion dollars in damage. In Windsor, one funnel cloud touched down at several locations taking eight lives at the Windsor Curling Club.
  • Edmund Fitzgerald Sinks in Great Lakes Storm - November 10, 1975. A severe storm causes the largest Great Lakes bulk ore carrier ever to break up and sink in 20 m-high waves, killing the entire 29-man crew. Canadian musician Gordon Lightfoot later immortalized the ship in a folk song.
  • Groundhog Day Storm Batters Bay of Fundy - February 2, 1976. One of the fiercest storms ever in the Maritimes slammed into Saint John, NB. Winds were clocked at 188 km/h, generating 12-m waves and swells as high as 10 m. Everything coated with salt spray for miles inland and huge chunks of coastline eroded.
  • Blizzard Isolates Iqaluit - February 8, 1979. Weather with -40°C temperatures, 100 km/h winds and zero visibility in snow kept residents of Iqaluit indoors for 10 days.

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Re: Weather In Canada 2019
« Reply #244 on: September 25, 2019, 12:56:01 AM »
Canada Top weather events of the 20th century
Top weather events from 1981-1999
  • Blizzard Maroons PEI - February 22-26, 1982. A huge snowstorm with up to 60 cm of snow, 100 km/h winds, zero visibility and wind chills of -35°C paralyzed the Island for a week. The storm buried vehicles, snowplows and trains in 5- to 7-metre drifts and cut off all ties with the mainland.
  • Ocean Ranger Disaster - February 15, 1982. Bad weather caused the sinking of the largest semi-submersible drilling rig in the world, 300 km east of Newfoundland. In total, 84 people died in the world's second worst disaster involving an offshore drill ship. Winds of 145 km/h, waves of 21 metres and high seas hampered rescue efforts.
  • Newfoundland Glaze Storm Cuts Power to 200,000 - April 13, 1984. Residents of the Avalon Peninsula were without electricity for days when cylinders of ice as large as 15 cm in diameter formed on overhead wires. The severe, two-day ice storm covered all of southeastern Newfoundland with 25 mm of glaze.
  • Tornadoes in Barrie and Central Ontario – May 31, 1985.  Fourteen tornadoes struck several Ontario communities, namely Barrie, Grand Valley, Orangeville and Tottenham.  The Barrie tornado killed eight people.  In all, the family of tornadoes injured hundreds of people, destroyed or damaged over 1,000 buildings and killed 12 people, tying it with the Pine Lake, AB tornado in 2000 as the fourth deadliest tornadic day in Canada.  The Grand Valley tornado that began near Arthur and moved east to Campbellford is considered one of the longest tracked tornadoes in Canada, travelling over 115 km.
  • Worst Air Crash in Canada - December 12, 1985. An Arrow Airlines DC-8, after refueling in Gander en route to Kentucky, crashed seconds after take-off, killing 248 members of the US 101st Airborne Division and 8 crew. Just before the crash, freezing drizzle and snow grains were reported. The temperature was -4.2°C and winds were light from the west.
  • Black Friday Tornado - July 31, 1987. One of Canada's most intense tornadoes ever struck Edmonton and killed 27 people -- the second worst killer tornado in Canada. Winds reached 400 km/h, cutting a swath of death and destruction 40 km long and as much as 1 km wide. In addition, hail as large as softballs and 40 to 50 mm of flooding rain fell on the city.
  • $4 Billion Drought - September 1987-August 1988. Across the southern Prairies, the hottest summer on record, combined with half the normal growing season rainfall and a virtually snow-free previous winter, produced a drought that rivaled the 1930s in terms of intensity and duration of the dry spell. About 10% of farmers and farm workers left agriculture in 1988. Effects of the drought were felt across the country as lower agricultural yields led to higher food and beverage prices for consumers.
  • Warmest Winter Olympics - February 1988. The Winter Olympics in Calgary experienced some of the warmest temperatures ever for late February. On February 26, Miami's high temperature of 19.4°C was only a shade warmer than Calgary's maximum of 18.1°C.
  • Record Wind Chill - January 28, 1989. It was bad enough when the temperature dropped to -51°C in Pelly Bay, NWT but the wind made the air feel even colder when the wind chill equivalent reached -91°C.
  • Hailstorm Strikes Calgary - September 7, 1991. A supper-hour storm lasting 30 minutes dropped 10-cm diameter hail in Calgary subdivisions, splitting trees, breaking windows and siding, and crushing birds. Homeowners filed a record 116,000 insurance claims, with property damage losses exceeding $300 million -- the most destructive hailstorm ever and the second costliest storm in Canada.
  • Canada's Only World-Weather Record - September 11, 1995. The QE2 ocean liner was struck by a 30-metre wave during Hurricane Luis off the coast of Newfoundland, marking the largest measured wave height in the world. The massive storm covered almost the entire North Atlantic, almost 2,000 km across.
  • Saguenay Flood - July 18-21, 1996. Canada's first billion dollar disaster, this deluge triggered a surge of water, rocks, trees and mud that killed 10 people and forced 12,000 residents to flee their homes. Many roads and bridges in the region disappeared.
  • Hailstorm Pounds Calgary and Winnipeg - July 24, 1996. Orange-sized hailstones racked up close to $300 million in property losses. Hail clogged storm sewers, causing extensive flooding in both cities and in Winnipeg, at least a third of the cars damaged had to be written off.
  • Red River Flood Levels Highest of Century - April-May, 1997. About 2,000 square km of valley lands were flooded as the Red River rose 12 m above winter levels. Thousands of volunteers and soldiers fought rising waters for days. Damage estimates reached a half a billion dollars.
  • Okanagan's $100 million Hailstorm - July 21, 1997. A destructive hail and wind storm ripped through the orchards of the Okanagan. It was the worst storm in memory with nearly 40% of the crop deemed unsuitable for fresh market. The rain and hail was accompanied by winds gusting to 100 km/h that capsized boats in the interior lakes, and caused power outages and traffic accidents.
  • Ice Storm of the Century - January 4-9, 1998. One of the most destructive and disruptive storms in Canadian history hit Eastern Canada causing hardship for 4 million people and costing $3 billion. Losses included millions of trees, 130 transmission towers and 120,000 km of power and telephone lines. Power outages lasted from several hours to four weeks.
  • A Year-Long Heat Wave - 1998. Canada experienced its second warmest winter and warmest spring, summer and fall on record. Temperatures in 1998 were an average of 2.4 degrees warmer than normal and likely the warmest year this century.
  • Costliest Forest Fire Season on Record - 1998. Flames from forest fires destroyed 4.6 million hectares of forests, about 50% more than the normal amount. The 10,560 fires were the greatest number in 10 years.
  • Toronto's Snowstorm of the Century - January 2-15, 1999. A series of storms stalked the city, dumping nearly a year's amount of snow in less than two weeks. In all, the city recorded the greatest January snowfall total ever with 118.4 cm and the greatest snow on the ground at any one time with 65 cm. The storms cost the city nearly twice the annual budget in snow removal.
  • Greatest Single-Day Snowfall Record - February 11, 1999. Tahtsa Lake, BC, received 145 cm of snow, a new Canadian single-day snowfall record, but well below the world's record of 192 cm at Silver Lake, Colorado on April 15, 1921

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather In Canada 2019
« Reply #245 on: September 26, 2019, 12:40:02 AM »
Significant snow threat expands across parts of western Canada, risk of 30 CM
Digital Writers
theweathernetwork.com

Tuesday, September 24th 2019, 8:00 pm - Expect a false start to winter with a blast of November-like weather late this week and weekend (and continuing into next week) that will cause significant impacts and or hardships with the fall harvest across parts of western Canada. Here's what you need to know.

Wednesday marks the final day of pleasant, early fall weather for parts of the western Prairies -- at least, the last one for a while. Even though fall has just begun, winter will come to call by the end of this week, with a full-blown fall snowstorm on the horizon. We take a look at the abrupt change, and who should have their shovels at the ready, below.

https://www.theweathernetwork.com/ca/news/article/first-week-of-fall-snow-looms-for-alberta-amid-sharp-cool-down

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Re: Weather In Canada 2019
« Reply #246 on: September 27, 2019, 01:13:36 AM »
Records are set to 'fall like dominoes' across Canada
Caroline Floyd

Meteorologist

Wednesday, September 25th 2019, 10:30 am - Summer 2019 was, perhaps, most memorable across Canada for being forgettable. Average heat, average rain -- most of the summer's weather didn't stand out.

Well, make way for the fall.

The new season's temperamental nature is about to make itself felt across the country. Significant weather records -- nearly from coast to coast -- are in jeopardy for the end of September and the beginning of October.

With weather record traffic about to get heavy, we check out where the old records are clear to proceed, and where we may be stopping for an update.

Visit our Complete Guide to Fall 2019 for an in-depth look at the Fall Forecast, tips to plan for it and a sneak peek at the winter ahead

https://www.theweathernetwork.com/ca/news/article/significant-canadian-weather-records-in-jeopardy-through-next-week

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Re: Weather In Canada 2019
« Reply #247 on: September 28, 2019, 01:29:16 AM »
Ontario: All-time record temperatures in jeopardy for start of October
Digital Writers
theweathernetwork.com

Thursday, September 26th 2019, 8:51 pm - All-time October heat records will be challenged in the days to come as temperatures soar across parts of southern Ontario.

The true temperamental side of the fall season is upon us as fluctuating temperatures and unsettled conditions make their way through southern Ontario this week. A temperature roller coaster is setting up for this weekend and exceptional warmth will kick off the start of October. We take a look at the active and changeable pattern ahead, plus where some places could break new temperature records with humidex values near 40, below.

Visit our Complete Guide to Fall 2019 for an in-depth look at the Fall Forecast, tips to plan for it and a sneak peek at the winter ahead
WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS:

    Risk for periods of rain showers heading into the weekend with a fine line between summer heat and cooler fall conditions
    Impressive temperature contrast across southwestern and eastern Ontario by Monday
    All-time temperature records for October will be challenged on Tuesday from Windsor to Hamilton
    Stay aware of ALERTS in your area

A FINE LINE BETWEEN SUMMER AND AUTUMN

After a cooler start to the autumn season earlier this week, summer’s fight quickly returned and will attempt to linger through the first full weekend of fall.

"A few rain showers are likely through Saturday, but the day will not be a washout as we will still have extended rain-free periods," says Weather Network meteorologist Dr. Doug Gillham. "Temperatures will continue to be a few degrees above seasonal before noticeably cooler weather returns on Sunday."
SUMMER'S GRAND FINALE COULD BRING 30°C TEMPS

Sunday's cooler temperature won't be the signal for a more autumnal pattern to kick in however, as "summer's grand finale" still has some impressive heat to give.

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Re: Weather In Canada 2019
« Reply #248 on: September 29, 2019, 01:19:05 AM »
Prairies brace for intense winter storm, 60+ cm of snow possible
Digital Writers
theweathernetwork.com

Friday, September 27th 2019, 8:45 pm - The first significant snow storm of the season is taking aim at the western Prairies, with dangerous travel set to last into the Monday morning commute.

All eyes are on much of western Canada as the region quickly plunges from early fall right into the heart of winter. Winter storm watches and special weather statements have expanded, warning of dangerous travel and significant impact as this severe fall snow storm brews.

"This is high impact snow storm, potentially of historical significance, for southern Alberta and southwestern Saskatchewan this weekend and into early next week," says Weather Network meteorologist Dr. Doug Gillham.


https://www.theweathernetwork.com/ca/news/article/first-significant-snow-storm-for-the-prairies-this-weekend-alberta-saskatchewan-long-duration-snowfall-event-with-dangerous-winter-travel-blizzard-conditions

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Re: Weather In Canada 2019
« Reply #249 on: September 30, 2019, 02:06:18 AM »
Environment Canada issues special weather statement for snow
Saskatoon / 650 CKOM
CJME News
September 27, 2019 03:02 pm
Environment Canada issues special weather statement for snow   

It may seem early to be thinking about winter with leaves still hanging on many of the trees, but some people in the province could end up dusting off the white stuff from their vehicles this weekend.

Environment Canada issued a special weather statement on Friday, calling for snowfall of up to 30 centimetres in areas in southwest Saskatchewan like Swift Current, Assiniboia, Gravelbourg, Leader and Maple Creek.

Before the statement was issued, meteorologist Justin Shaer discussed the possibility of snow this weekend.

“It hasn’t been -15 C or something yet for a while. So we are looking at warmer temperatures and with that we do have more moisture. We get that heavier, stickier snow with it,” Shaer said.

“Especially over the Cypress Hills with the higher terrain into (those southwest communities), it does look like you would have to dust off the shovel for this time of year.”

Rain is in the forecast for Swift Current for Friday and Sunday, with temperatures ranging from 2 C to 7 C. But the weather agency is calling for a mix of rain and snow with a high of 4 C on Sunday.

Regina and Saskatoon likely won’t see any snow this weekend, but there is some forecast for both cities on Monday.

Saskatoon should hit highs of 7 C on Friday and Saturday and then 6 C on Sunday.

Meanwhile, Regina is expected to hit 8 C on Friday, then 5 C with a mix of sun and cloud on Saturday and then 4 C on Sunday with some rain.

“There is a chance you could get a mix (of rain and snow) Sunday night and into Monday,” Shaer said. “Even in Moose Jaw and creeping north to the Outlook region.”

He said the moisture and possible snow are coming from a system developing over B.C. and the pacific northwest areas of the United States, stretching east over parts of Wyoming.

https://www.ckom.com/2019/09/27/environment-canada-issues-special-weather-statement-for-snow/

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Re: Weather In Canada 2019
« Reply #250 on: October 01, 2019, 02:33:41 AM »
PHOTOS: Fierce winter storm buries cars, brings 90+ cm of snow to the Prairies
Digital Writers
theweathernetwork.com

Monday, September 30th 2019, 6:30 am - All-time September snowfall records have been broken.

What fall? Parts of the Prairies appear to have skipped a season all together, jumping straight into winter with new September snowfall records now broken.

Cold air descending from the arctic combined with a potent and slow moving low pressure system has brought days of heavy snow and blizzard conditions to southern Alberta and Saskatchewan. Snowfall and winter storm warnings were issued across both regions, including the City of Calgary, which set a new all-time September daily snowfall record on Sunday.


https://www.theweathernetwork.com/ca/news/article/calgary-alberta-saskatchewan-are-seeing-intense-snowstorm-in-the-prairies-that-could-be-record-breaking

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Re: Weather In Canada 2019
« Reply #251 on: October 02, 2019, 01:54:50 AM »
Yesterday's hot and cold spots ...

Hot spot in Ontario: 25.0 °C     77.0 °F Windsor Airport

Cold spot in Ontario: -2.7 °C    27.1 °F Peawanuck

Hot spot in Canada: 25.0 °C    77.0 °F Windsor Airport, ON

Cold spot in Canada: -19.1 °C  -2.4 °F Thomsen River, NT
« Last Edit: October 02, 2019, 01:58:10 AM by PaulMy »

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather In Canada 2019
« Reply #252 on: October 03, 2019, 03:26:08 AM »
A Viral Tweet Shows What Canada's Weather Is Really Like & The Rest Of The World Is Shook
Nothing new here!
Helena Hanson16 hours ago
Updated on October 01 @ 05:25 PM
Article Featured Image
Shiny Things | Flickr

Most Canadians don’t even think twice about the crazy weather we often experience in Canada. Whether it be tennis-ball sized hailstones, snow in September, or post-apocalytic-style storms, it’s just another day up North! However, when the rest of the world got a glimpse of Canada’s weather last week, they literally couldn't believe what Canadians have to regularly deal with.

When one Twitter account shared a short video of an intense Canadian hailstorm last week, they probably didn’t expect it to go viral. However, the clip was later retweeted by a different Twitter user, who added a hilarious comment about Canada, and it ended up being viewed more than 11.7 million times - and the rest of the world just couldn't believe it!

Retweeting the intense and terrifying hail storm clip over the weekend, one Twitter user added the caption, “Why did I think nothing bad happens in Canada?”

The video quickly went viral worldwide and was met with thousands of responses, with many people from across the globe expressing their shock that Canada has such weather.

https://www.narcity.com/news/ca/the-hailstorm-in-canada-tweet-has-the-rest-of-the-world-shook

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Re: Weather In Canada 2019
« Reply #253 on: October 04, 2019, 02:24:26 AM »
Think you know the rainiest big city in Canada? Think again
Mia Gordon
Reporter, British Columbia
Tuesday, October 1st 2019, 3:00 pm - Sometimes statistics aren't what they seem.

Fall is here, and that means the rainy season is upon us in British Columbia.

Vancouver has become so well known for its fall rain that tourists and locals have dubbed it "Raincouver." But you might be surprised to find out there's a city east of Vancouver that actually gets more rainfall on average; 300 mm more to be exact. Abbotsford, B.C. averages 1483 mm of rain each year, while Vancouver International Airport reports an average of 1153 mm.

Visit our Complete Guide to Fall 2019 for an in-depth look at the Fall Forecast, tips to plan for it and a sneak peek at the winter ahead

So why is this the case? Well, as Tyler Hamilton explains, it has a lot to do with Vancouver Island and the Olympic Mountains. While Vancouver sits partially in a rain shadow, the mountains' influence doesn't extend as far as Abbotsford.
FROM THE MET DESK: WHY STATS ARE SOMETIMES NOT WHAT THEY SEEM

The other side of the story also comes down to location, but that has more to do with where we take official observations than geography. Official records for Vancouver are recorded at the airport, south of downtown and much farther into the rain shadowed area.

If we take a closer look at Downtown Vancouver, it's closer and more similar to West Vancouver -- which receives on average 1830 mm of rainfall annually.

In fact, as Tyler explains, if you look 10 km outside of downtown Vancouver, some areas like Lynn Creek receive double the amounts of rainfall that YVR gets each year. The mountains are partially to blame for this once again, since upsloping winds help 'wring' extra moisture from the air.

Because of the mountains, you can have tremendous variability of rainfall in just a small radius across the Lower Mainland. Meaning that it can be pouring in West Vancouver and just down the road at the airport, it might be a light drizzle.

Now there is no arguing that the rainiest city, regardless of size, is also located in B.C. That title goes to Prince Rupert, which sees a staggering average of 2593.6 mm of rain each year.


https://www.theweathernetwork.com/ca/news/article/why-abbotsford-is-the-rainiest-big-city-in-canada

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Re: Weather In Canada 2019
« Reply #254 on: October 05, 2019, 02:15:15 AM »
Subzero temperatures, wind chill back tonight in the capital

Ottawa-Gatineau dipping to -2 with slight wind chill overnight
CBC News · Posted: Oct 04, 2019 6:04 AM ET | Last Updated: 3 hours ago
Leaves fall near the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa last year. Temperatures will be falling more than 10 degrees from the daytime high to the overnight low tonight. (Ian Black/CBC)

Adieu, humidex. Hello again, wind chill.

The region is expected to dip below 0 C tonight, with wind chill showing up again in the forecast.

In Ottawa, that means an overnight low of -2 C with a slight wind chill making it feel like -4 by early Saturday morning.

That could make it the coldest Oct. 5 in Ottawa since 1965, when it was -3.3 C.

Kingston may keep its head above freezing at 0 C tonight with a light wind.

Needless to say, that means frost across the board. Fog is expected in most areas as well.

With a high of 9.9 C yesterday, Ottawa didn't crack double digits for the 1st time since May 2.

It hasn't been below zero there since late April.
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/ottawa-gatineau-weather-october-4-2019-1.5308620

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Re: Weather In Canada 2019
« Reply #255 on: October 06, 2019, 01:51:12 AM »
The science behind Canada's 'classic' fall storms
Caroline Floyd
Meteorologist

Thursday, October 3rd 2019, 4:30 pm - Just what is a 'Classic Fall Storm' in Canada?

The turbulent weather that marks Canada's fall season can be as varied as the colours of the changing leaves. So it's no surprise that a 'classic fall storm' means different things to different Canadians. While each of these classic systems is driven, broadly, by the same mechanism -- the changing angle of the Sun in the sky -- they manifest in vastly different ways across the country.

Visit our Complete Guide to Fall 2019 for an in-depth look at the Fall Forecast, tips to plan for it and a sneak peek at the winter ahead
BRITISH COLUMBIA -- THE SOUTHEASTER

Autumn marks the return of the rainy season in British Columbia, but it isn't necessarily rain or alpine snow residents think of when they think fall storm.

That honour often goes to the winds: The 'Southeaster' that brings strong, often damaging, winds to coastal B.C.
WATCH BELOW: INSIDE B.C.'S CLASSIC FALL STORMS

The culprit here is a low pressure centre that steers across central Vancouver Island and spurs intense coastal wind gusts in its wake. These strong gusts kick up in the wake of the system's cold front, as atmospheric pressure rises sharply. Combine that with the channelling effect between the mainland and Vancouver Island, and gusts can easily surpass 100 km/h.

In December 2018, this type of storm left more than 600,000 people around the South Coast without power after it proved the 'most destructive in B.C. Hydro history.'
PRAIRIES -- THE STALLED LOW

While the Alberta clipper may be the most famous, there's a system that packs more of a punch when it comes to fall storms on the Prairies. The ingredients aren't as common, but when they do join forces, it's time to pull out the snow shovels.
FROM THE MET DESK: STALLED LOW? PREPARE FOR SNOW

A low pressure centre stalled over the central Rockies serves to draw Pacific moisture over the mountains and funnels it into southern and central Alberta. Combine this with cold air flooding down from the Arctic, and you've got the perfect recipe for extreme snow events in central and southern Alberta.

It's because of lows like these the foothills of southwestern Alberta tend to see their highest snowfall totals for the year in fall and spring, rather than the heart of winter. Winter high pressure from the Arctic deflecting the jet stream tends to make drier clippers and frigid air outbreaks more prevalent than these moisture-laden, border-skimming Pacific lows.
ONTARIO & QUEBEC -- THE COLORADO LOW

Only a select few storms achieve the status of a household name, but the Colorado low has undoubtedly earned its place in the group. The most energetic low pressure systems that sweep North America in the fall are often Colorado lows.
FROM THE MET DESK: ACTIVE FROM THE GULF OF MEXICO TO HUDSON BAY

Fall is prime time for these systems, as the jet stream starts to dip south over the Rockies and northern U.S. Plains. That brings cold air into conflict with lingering summertime heat and humidity from the Gulf of Mexico. When the two collide, you get a massive, potent low pressure system, barreling toward the Great Lakes with everything from snow and freezing rain to severe thunderstorms and tornadoes.
ATLANTIC CANADA -- THE NOR'EASTER

Another big name, the howling winds of the nor'easter are the hallmark of Atlantic Canada's classic fall system. These storms pack the potential for every type of precipitation and hurricane-force wind gusts and are some of the most potent in North America.
WATCH BELOW: GULF STREAM IS STORM FUEL FOR ATLANTIC CANADA

The impact of these storms depends a lot on the track they take. Those that sail into the heart of the Maritimes bring rain, freezing rain, and snow across the region. Those that skim past offshore spawn blasting winds and heavy snow across the board. Nor'easters are also famous for becoming 'weather bombs' -- low pressure centres that intensify dramatically in only a few hours as they travel up the Eastern Seaboard.
https://www.theweathernetwork.com/ca/news/article/the-science-behind-the-classic-fall-storm-in-regions-across-canada



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Re: Weather In Canada 2019
« Reply #256 on: October 07, 2019, 02:01:43 AM »
When should you switch to winter tires? Provincial breakdown, here
Digital Writers
theweathernetwork.com

Saturday, October 5th 2019, 8:41 am - See when to book your appointment at the garage.

Like it or not, most Canadians will soon need to make the switch to winter tires for their vehicles. Some provinces do have laws in place, dictating the deadline for making the swap, but Mother Nature provides her own clues for when to schedule that appointment with your garage.

Visit our Complete Guide to Fall 2019 for an in-depth look at the Fall Forecast, tips to plan for it and a sneak peek at the winter ahead

By design, winter tires are engineered to enhance your car's handling, traction, and braking performance when the temperature is below 7ºC. While short bouts of cooler weather do battle with lingering summer-like temperatures through the early fall across most of the country, there does come a day when the average high dips below 7, and stays there until spring.

Meteorologist André Monette of MétéoMédia, The Weather Network's Québec-based sister station, breaks down those dates for us, region by region.
WESTERN CANADA

WestAverage 7

While the temperatures don't drop to 7ºC until much later, winter or all-season tires are required by law on many routes in B.C. starting on October 1.
ONTARIO & QUEBEC

ONAverage 7

Québec is the other province that mandates winter tires for drivers. They're required between December 1 and March 15.
ATLANTIC CANADA

QC ATLAverage 7 (1)

While no government in Atlantic Canada requires the use of winter tires, a 2018 study did suggest drivers there are among the most prepared to meet winter driving conditions. According to the report, 94 per cent of drivers there opt for winter tires.

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Re: Weather In Canada 2019
« Reply #257 on: October 09, 2019, 02:16:46 AM »
Ontario: Stretch of sunny days in the south, big snow looms for the north
Digital Writers
theweathernetwork.com

Tuesday, October 8th 2019, 8:53 am - Most of the week will feature abundant sunshine and near-seasonal temperatures in southern Ontario.

Fall lovers, this may be the week of the season for you in southern Ontario. Mainly sunny skies and temperatures right around seasonal may even change your mind if fall isn't your favourite. Autumn is famous for its changeable nature, however, and by the end of the week, that may mean significant snow for some parts of the province. We take a look at this extended stretch of perfect fall weather, and a look ahead to the cooling pattern expected for the Thanksgiving weekend, below.

Visit our Complete Guide to Fall 2019 for an in-depth look at the Fall Forecast, tips to plan for it and a sneak peek at the winter ahead
WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS:

    High pressure continues to keep conditions dry and seasonal across Ontario
    Cold front slowly approaches and crosses southern Ontario for second half of weekend
    Changeable pattern expected to continue through mid-October
    Stay aware of ALERTS in your area

GORGEOUS STRETCH OF FALL WEATHER

High pressure over the Great Lakes region will bring a welcomed stretch of mainly sunny skies across much of Ontario this week, with highs right around the seasonal mark. While winds will be on the breezy side, particularly across the south, afternoon temperatures are still expected to climb into the mid-to-upper teens for many, all the way up to the Nickel Belt.
https://www.theweathernetwork.com/ca/news/article/sunny-pleasant-conditions-in-southern-ontario-gta-before-cool-down-comes-with-thanksgiving-weather-outlook

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Re: Weather In Canada 2019
« Reply #258 on: October 10, 2019, 01:55:41 AM »
Yesterday's hot and cold spots ...

Hot spot in Northwest Territories: 6.8 °C      44.2 °F Fort Liard

Cold spot in Northwest Territories: -12.4 °C   9.7 °F Deadmen Valley

Hot spot in Canada: 24.1 °C                        75.4 °F Morden AAFC, MB

Cold spot in Canada: -18.8 °C                      -1.8 °F Burwash, YT

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Re: Weather In Canada 2019
« Reply #259 on: October 11, 2019, 01:43:12 AM »
Why monarchs gather at the southernmost point in Canada
Cheryl Santa Maria
Digital Reporter

Wednesday, October 9th 2019, 1:50 pm - Weather Network meteorologist and storm chaser Mark Robinson recently visited Point Pelee, Ontario, Canada's southernmost mainland tip, to check in on the monarch butterflies.

Each year monarchs -- arguably the most recognizable of all North American butterfly species due to distinct orange, black and white markings -- make their way to Mexico, travelling up to 160 kilometres per day.

This species has the longest and largest insect migration in North America, travelling up to 8,000 km a year.

As they migrate the butterflies help pollinate approximately one-third of the fruits and vegetables that humans consume.

Point Pelee is a stopping point for monarchs on their journey. On some days, there can be thousands of them in the area says Pascale Gerdun, a park interpreter at Point Pelee National Park.

Monarchs follow shorelines and only cross water when they have to. When they reach Point Pelee, they'll have a break and wait for a wind that will help them on their journey.
https://www.theweathernetwork.com/ca/news/article/heres-why-monarchs-gather-at-the-southernmost-point-in-canada


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