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Author Topic: Weather in Canada 2018  (Read 109640 times)

Offline mark

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Unprecedented snowfall strands hundreds in Alberta town.
« Reply #280 on: October 14, 2018, 08:33:38 AM »
Canmore, Alberta – Heavy snowfall, up to 60 cm (2 ft), resulted in nightmarish conditions on the highway, piles of vehicles winding up in the ditch and many more forced to turn around.

Unexpected guests were forced to stay overnight after the closure of the Trans Canada Highway on the evening of Oct. 2 from Dead Man’s Flats all the way past Lac Des Arcs.

A warming center was set up at the Canmore Collegiate High School, but there were not enough cots to accommodate everyone.


“I’m told a little over 300 people were there, and most of them spent the night,” said Mayor John Borrowman the following day.

“My guess is that the hotel rooms were largely full as well. There were a lot of travellers on the highway that were stranded here,” said Borrowman.

The unprecedented snowfall caused Canmore’s Emergency Operations Centre to come online to help deal with the crisis.

https://www.thecragandcanyon.ca/news/local-news/canmore-pitches-in-with-hundreds-stranded-due-to-snowfall

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #281 on: October 15, 2018, 02:40:47 AM »
Snow won't go: Winter weather system stalls over southeastern Manitoba
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/winter-snowfall-warning-manitoba-1.4858303

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #282 on: October 16, 2018, 02:39:48 AM »
Yesterday's hot and cold spots ...

Hot spot in Ontario: 16.7 °C  62.1 °F CFB Borden

Cold spot in Ontario: -7.2 °C  19.0 °F Ogoki Post Airport

Hot spot in Canada: 19.2 °C  66.6 °F Fort Nelson Airport, BC

Cold spot in Canada: -28.3 °C  -18.9 °F Thomsen River, NT

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #283 on: October 17, 2018, 02:22:56 AM »
ATLANTIC CANADA | The Next One
'Weather bomb' threatens Atl. Canada, winter storm for some


NEWFOUNDLAND: Damaging winds over 120 km/h followed by SNOW?
Monday, October 15, 2018, 6:16 PM -    After a bout of wet weather in Atlantic Canada, courtesy of the remnants of Michael, all eyes are now on a potent low set to deepen over the Gulf of the St. Lawrence Monday night through Tuesday, which will likely spiral into the first 'weather bomb' of the fall season for the Atlantic provinces. The storm will boast wind gusts in excess of 100 km/h along with heavy rainfall while simultaneously developing into a full-fledged winter storm for some. More on the specific impacts of this system, and a definition for what exactly a 'weather bomb' is, below.

WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS:
    Intense low deepens over Atlantic Canada Monday night into Tuesday
    Low pressure system has the potential to 'bomb out'
    Heavy rain and 100 km/h wind gusts possible, especially in southern and eastern Newfoundland
    Wind warnings in effect for ALL of Newfoundland, parts of Maritimes; winter storm warnings for Eagle River, Labrador

'Weather bomb' is an unofficial term, describing a low pressure system who's central pressure falls 24 millibars (or more) in 24 hours. This process is known meteorologically as explosive cyclogenesis or bombogenesis.

These storms are famous for their winds. Tropical storm to hurricane-force wind gusts can be associated with weather bombs -- essentially, the lower the central pressure, the stronger the storm. The 'deeper' the low becomes (the lower the central pressure), the more intense its wind field will be.

For example, in a hurricane the central pressure drops to extremely low levels. Back in October of 1979, Typhoon Tip's pressure dropped to a staggering 870 mb in the western Pacific Ocean, and still holds the lowest pressure recorded by a tropical cyclone. While we won't come close to this type of pressure, it's the rapid intensification (in combination with a couple of other factors) that can generate destructive hurricane-force wind gusts.

STORM FORECAST
A deepening upper level trough over northern Ontario is set to slide in behind a weak low exiting southern Ontario late Monday.

"This will draw in dry air aloft from the central U.S., while the low simultaneously starts to tap into the warm, moist surface air over the Atlantic Ocean," says Weather Network meteorologist Kevin MacKay. "All of these factors will work together to rapidly deepen the low over the course of Monday night and Tuesday, resulting in the low to potentially 'bomb out' over Atlantic Canada."

Winds will begin to increase Monday night through Tuesday, but may be in excess of 100 km/h especially along southern and eastern portions of Newfoundland, as well as Nova Scotia's Inverness and Victory counties and across Prince Edward Island. Anticipate a rather windy and wet day throughout Newfoundland, with the potential for some power outages across the island, especially in the hardest hit areas of the Avalon and Burin Peninsulas, including the city of St. John's.

"We are currently highlighting the threat for wind gusts of up to 100 km/h, but there is some potential for the winds to overachieve with the threat for damaging gusts of 120+ km/h," says Weather Network meteorologist Dr. Doug Gillham. "The strongest winds may not mix all the way to the surface, but we will closely monitor the threat for damaging wind."

RAINFALL AMOUNTS
Along with the powerful winds, heavy rain will be working its way east, beginning Monday night through the Maritimes into Tuesday morning and continuing through Tuesday across Newfoundland. Opting for a poncho may be best way to tackle the wet weather on Tuesday as the winds will essentially make for a useless umbrella.

As the low deepens and tracks near Red Bay, cold air will wrap around the storm, producing a swath of heavy snowfall through Eagle River and parts of southeastern Labrador. Some residents, including areas along the Trans-Labrador Highway from Happy Valley-Goose Bay and Port Hope Simpson, will pick up 20 to 30 cm by Wednesday morning. Driving will become hazardous as the winds and snowfall pick up in tandem and visibility drops to near zero at times Tuesday.

POST-WEATHER BOMB: UNSETTLED PATTERN, FIRST FLAKES FOR SOME
Behind the system Tuesday night and through the rest of the week, a deep trough in the jet stream will sweep cold air over the region, setting the stage for some sea-effect snow off the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

As the cold air lingers late week, another low travels over the Atlantic, but the circumstances will be much different this time around across the south. Rain will mix and change to snow, potentially accumulating across parts of the Maritimes, particularly for the Cape Breton Highlands and over central/western Newfoundland.

"Yet another system will strengthen as it tracks north of the region this weekend, but a secondary low could develop over the Maritimes, bringing strong winds and rain with heavy snow for parts of Labrador," says Gillham.

Check back for updates as we continue to monitor this system.

With files from meteorologist Erin Wenckstern.

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #284 on: October 18, 2018, 01:51:54 AM »
Komoka had first frost of the 2018-2018 season October 16th at -1.8°C.
New frost record for Windsor, ON  https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/windsor/windsor-ties-74-year-cold-weather-record-1.4864670

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #285 on: October 18, 2018, 08:59:54 AM »
CANADA | Winter is Coming
Canada is out-snowing the King of Winter
Canada's the new 'King', in terms of having the most area covered in snow

Wednesday, October 17, 2018, 6:00 AM -    Well Canada, you have accomplished quite the feat so far this fall: out-snowing the reigning King of Winter, Siberia. Known for its bone-chilling, eyelash-freezing -50°C temperatures, there's often no contest when it comes to Siberia versus North America in the snowfall department, but this season has been on the extreme ends for both regions, allowing Canada to briefly steal the title.

https://www.theweathernetwork.com/news/articles/canada-out-snows-siberia-fall-snowfall-record-pattern-change/115127

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #286 on: October 20, 2018, 02:10:45 AM »
Calgary Weather: A record high on Weed Wednesday?

On the same day that the Canadian government federally legalized cannabis, Calgary is looking to try and break an all-time temperature high.

Wednesday is set to hit a high of 22 C — 2.4 degrees off from the all-time high for that day of 24.4 C set in 1963, according to Environment Canada.

The warm weather comes in the midst of a strong stretch of warm weather with daytime highs in the mid-teens and daytime lows staying above zero.

Thursday will hit a high of 15 C, Friday a high of 11 C and the weekend will hit a high of 13 C.

Temperatures will stay high into next week, with Monday and Tuesday hitting 20 C and 21 C, respectively.
Today’s High     22 C
Tonight’s Low     2 C
Average High     12.2 C
Average Low     -1.4 C
Historic High     24.4 C in 1963
Historic Low     -13.9 in 1892
Tomorrow’s High                15 C
Tomorrow’s Low                1C

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #287 on: October 21, 2018, 02:18:41 AM »
'The blob' returns, storms next week to put it to the test
THE BLOB: It's back, what it means for the weather in British Columbia

Thursday, October 18, 2018, 3:44 PM -    It's back. The last known sighting of "The Blob" was in the fall of 2016; subsequently, it quickly dissolved into a pool of cooler-than-normal sea surface temperature anomalies off the coast of British Columbia. An even more impressive blob was in place in 2014, and played a key role in dictating the weather patterns for the Pacific Northwest, especially in the winter months.

Are we off the hook for a snowy winter?
FAST FACTS: THE BLOB
    Large anomalous area of elevated water temperature in the northern Pacific Ocean, first developed in 2014 and lingered well into 2015
    The 'ridiculous resilient ridge' was a major culprit to the warming, as this semi-permanent feature become a dominant weather feature
    After a brief resurgence in September 2016, the blob faded away, until October 2018, where signs are emerging of its triumphant return
    Active storm track will burst into the scene next week, and will be a big test for the blob

Those who reside in British Columbia know how tame the winter of 2014 and 2015 was for lower elevation snow, with many locations remaining snow-free for several years immediately adjacent to the water. The latter year, 2015, scraped by with near normal snowfall for a large chuck of the alpine, but 2014 was atrocious in most alpine locations across the province.

After the brief resurgence of the blob in September 2016, a cool sea surface temperature anomaly developed as we entered the heart of the 2017 winter season.

Those in Vancouver and across the South Coast were pummeled by numerous rounds of snowfall, especially in February of 2017, with snow depth in excess of 40 cm in pockets – even at sea level locations.

LONG TERM BLOB FORECAST
When dissecting the next several weeks of weather predictions and computer models, an active storm track will burst into the scene next week, and will be a big test for the blob. The resilient ridging and 'mega ridge' in Alaska has also played a significant role in fueling the extreme water temperature anomalies, but the fall storms are great at mixing and stirring up the stagnant water, which may wash out the warm anomaly. But, this is highly dependent on how deep this temperature anomaly exists below the sea surface. If it's a relatively shallow feature, Pacific storms should have some success in dismantling the blob.

But, it won't be a permanent pattern change. We have high confidence for a return to ridging towards the end of October and into early November. If the blob survives the brief bout of stormy weather next week, it's possible it may become more reinforced in November.

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #288 on: October 23, 2018, 01:49:58 AM »
Stormy week ahead in double-punch for Atlantic Canada
An active storm track will keep Atlantic Canada in the spotlight this week


Sunday, October 21, 2018, 3:25 PM -    Fall storm season has well and truly begun across Atlantic Canada, with flooding rain and heavy snow already in the books, and another week of active weather ahead as storm after storm sweeps through the region. We're watching for another two major storms before October wraps up -- one of which may be sparked, in part, by a far-off tropical system. We take a look at the wet and windy week ahead, and the active storm track behind it all, below.

WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS:
    Active storm track continues for Atlantic Canada
    Sea-effect snow expected for western Newfoundland, Gaspe, Cape Breton on Monday
    Next major system moves in late Tuesday; more heavy rain on the way, plus snow risk for New Brunswick
    Keeping close eye on potential tropical-infused fall storm for next weekend

Monday will be a quieter day across most of Atlantic Canada, after this past weekend's heavy rain eases out of Newfoundland and leaves only streamers of sea-effect snow in its wake. Accumulations aren't expected to be significant, but some spots in western Newfoundland may pick up a few centimetres in particularly persistent bands.

The real action moves back into the region late Tuesday, as a low pressure system creeps into the southern Maritimes, bringing with it another round of soaking rain and -- for some -- a blast of snow. Unlike the weekend system, the centre of this low looks to track a bit further west, and that means more rain this time for New Brunswick, and another shot for Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. With the continuing flow of moisture up the Eastern Seaboard, there's the potential for another heavy rainfall event for central and southern Newfoundland Wednesday and Thursday.

Further inland -- and closer to the encroaching cold air that will wrap-around behind the intensifying low pressure centre -- we're looking at the risk for the first significant shot of snow for parts of northern New Brunswick. Before the low pulls away to the north, even western P.E.I. may see a few flurries late Wednesday night or early Thursday morning.

Strong winds will again be a concern with this next system, especially with the ground already saturated and some leaves remaining on trees. Downed trees and power lines may be an issue Wednesday and Wednesday night.

LAST DAYS OF OCTOBER -- TROPICAL-INFUSED STORM?
Forecast confidence is rising that the last few days of October will also be stormy ones across Atlantic Canada, with the continent's active storm track keeping the region squarely in its cross hairs. The mid-week system will serve to reinforce the pattern in place over North America, which sees the jet stream diving well to the south over the Great Lakes and Eastern Seaboard. In fact, this dip in the jet stream seems poised to stretch far enough south to 'scoop up' moisture from the remnants of Hurricane Willa as it streams across the southern United States and drag it up into eastern Canada -- giving next weekend's potential storm a tropical punch.

It's still early days for this system, and exactly what shape it takes will come down to the interplay of a number of features in the atmosphere -- including a disturbance expected to trek across the Great Lakes through late week -- and that means it's too early for specifics when it comes to the potential storm. What we can say now is that Atlantic Canada seems well positioned to keep its place as Canada's Active Weather Capital as we round out this last week of October.

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #289 on: October 24, 2018, 02:39:33 AM »
Ocean too warm to cool Canadian science ship's engines
CBC News


Monday, October 22, 2018, 2:10 PM -    Offshore Nova Scotia surface ocean temperatures were so warm earlier this month they forced a Canadian research ship that uses seawater to cool its engines to slow down.

The Canadian Coast Guard Ship Hudson was carrying out its annual fall ocean conditions survey in September and October and sailing through water measuring 20 to 24 C.

That is five or six degrees above normal, said research scientist Dave Hebert who was on board.

Warm enough the chief engineer took notice.
"The temperatures were pretty warm so it was harder for them to cool the engines down. They didn't run it with all the engines running because the engine was getting too hot. And they just couldn't do it," said Hebert.

The four engine Hudson slowed from 14 to 10 knots, he said and ran on two of its four engines until it encountered cooler water closer to shore.

It had no impact on the mission, but it got Dave Hebert's attention, who has served on many Hudson cruises as part of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Atlantic Zone Monitoring Program.

"We've really never had this issue before but the ship has operated in warmer water. So they [the crew] are used to that sort of thing, but it was new to me to hear that," he said.

Hebert said the warm surface temperatures are no mystery. They were a hangover from the heat wave that struck Atlantic Canada in the summer of 2018 and an absence of storms.

On board the Hudson the fall trip itself was conducted in tee shirt and shorts weather on flat seas. In deeper water scientists recorded cooler temperatures justly slightly above the thirty year average.

Hebert said the most recent readings show the surface temperatures are returning to normal at around 14 C.

This story was written for the CBC by Paul Withers.

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #290 on: October 25, 2018, 02:11:33 AM »
Waterspout Outbreak On Lake Ontario
https://www.theweathernetwork.com/news/articles/waterspout-outbreak-southern-ontario-great-lakes-erie-wellington-sandbanks-photos-video-explainer-science-behind-fall/115624
Tuesday, October 23, 2018, 2:20 PM -    Weather conditions have been ripe for the development of waterspouts this week across Lakes Ontario and Erie, with multiple sightings reported Tuesday afternoon.

Photos of spouts have been making the rounds over social media, with multiple images taken by residents in Wellington, Ont.

As a result, Environment Canada issued a special marine warning Tuesday for all of Lake Ontario and eastern Lake Erie.

"Waterspouts have been reported over Lake Ontario and Lake Erie," says the warning. "The conditions will remain favourable for waterspouts this afternoon and evening."

SHARE YOUR WEATHER: Upload your photos and videos for a chance to be featured on TheWeatherNetwork.com.

The easiest way to distinguish the difference between a tornado and a waterspout is simply if it occurs over water. A waterspout in general is any tornado over a body of water, typically a non-supercell tornado in its most common form.

According to the U.S. National Weather Service, a waterspout is a small, relatively weak rotating column of air over water beneath a cumulonimbus or towering cumulus cloud. Waterspouts are most common over tropical or subtropical waters. The exact definition of waterspout is debatable. In most cases the term is reserved for small vortices over water that are not associated with storm-scale rotation (i.e., they are the water-based equivalent of landspouts).

RELATED: VIRAL VIDEO: Watch a firenado become a waterspout

While most of Tuesday is expected to be rain-free in southern Ontario, scattered rain showers are possiblewith brief downpours along a cold front that could mix with small hail or graupel in some areas. Chilly single digit temperatures dominate the forecast for the rest of the week, with lake-effect snow in the cards for parts.

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #291 on: October 26, 2018, 02:12:36 AM »
Yesterday's hot and cold spots ...

Hot spot in Ontario: 11.2 °C  52.2 °F Fort Frances

Cold spot in Ontario: -7.2 °C  19.0 °F Atikokan

Hot spot in Canada: 25.2 °C  77.4 °F Cross Lake Jenpeg, MB

Cold spot in Canada: -31.6 °C  -24.9 °F Shepherd Bay Airport, NU

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #292 on: October 29, 2018, 01:54:37 AM »
Heavy rainfalls, snow on the way for British Columbia
Saturday, October 27, 2018, 4:42 PM -   

October is nearly over, and that means Christmas will be here in less than two months. Although some parts of B.C. might not be looking like a Winter Wonderland anytime soon, incoming snow and heavy rainfalls are expected Saturday night through to Monday. Conditions are expected to remain unsettled through next week for the west coast.

More on what to expect from the rest of the weekend, below.

WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS
    80+ km/h wind gusts along the north coast Saturday night
    Heavy rainfall of up to 90 mm along west Vancouver Island, with locally higher amounts
    Up to 40 cm of alpine snow expected along coastal mountains, up to 20 cm along interior mountains

Temperatures will be starting to drop subtly throughout Sunday and into Monday, as an upper-level trough moves over the region. However, temperatures will be remaining near seasonal through the week.

Areas along west Vancouver Island can expect between 70-90 mm of heavy rainfall, while areas up toward Whistler can expect between 30-60 mm. Kelowna is getting off easy only 10-20 mm of rainfall expected through Sunday.

WIND
As a pacific low pressure system approaches the coast, strong southeasterly winds gusting up to 80 kilometers per hour will impact exposed coastal areas Saturday evening into the overnight hours. Gusty southwesterly winds continue Sunday morning with a passage of a cold front.

Some areas are looking to get some snow, but thankfully it’s not looking like enough snow to put a damper on any Halloween trick-or-treating plans! Snow is expected for elevations above 1600m, between 20-40 cm along coastal mountains and 10-20 cm around interior mountains.

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #293 on: October 30, 2018, 02:33:33 AM »
Canada's dry lakes and dust storms 'warning for planet'
CBC News

Sunday, October 28, 2018, 4:17 PM -    Gwenn Flowers, a glaciologist, trudges back and forth across a vast glacier in southwest Yukon, pulling a radar device mounted on skis behind her.

"We as Canadians are stewards of about a third of the world's mountain glaciers and ice caps, so this is our responsibility," Flowers says.

The dramatic changes to the glaciers in the Yukon are an early warning of what climate change could mean for the rest of the planet, researchers say. And Flowers sees lots of reason for concern reflected in the state of the ice.

Glaciologist Gwenn Flowers tows equipment over Yukon's Kaskawulsh glacier to check its depth. (Susan Ormiston/CBC)

The professor at B.C.'s Simon Fraser University loves ice. She has been coming to do field studies in the St. Elias mountains every summer for the past 13 years.

Her tiny team of three is mapping the Kaskawulsh glacier — 70 kilometres long and five kilometres wide — as it struggles under the double threat of a warming climate and diminishing snow cover.

The research boils down to an inescapable conclusion: The glacier can't compensate for the volume it's losing now each year.

The radar box Flowers tows on skis is specifically adapted for ice, and sends signals deep into the glacier's core, bouncing off the bedrock. In places, the team has found ice more than 800 metres deep.

The team's research shows the ice is rapidly thinning, however, losing about a half metre a year, says Flowers. And the enormous glacier is retreating.

The St. Elias mountain range crossing Yukon, B.C. and Alaska is less well-known than the Canadian Rockies and its icefields. But its ice cover is six times larger, making it the biggest icefield in the world outside Greenland and Antarctica.

Flowers and her team are trying to get a better picture of how the glacier is changing, and what that means to the larger environment.

"As Canadians, given our responsibility to be stewards of this ice, I think we could be doing better. I think Arctic science should be a priority. I think understanding our terrestrial and marine ice should be a national priority," Flowers says.

A 2018 report, entitled State of the Mountains, suggests the glaciers in the St. Elias Mountains are losing more ice than in any other Canadian Alpine area. In the 30 years from 1977 to 2007, the Kaskawulsh lost 17 square kilometres of ice.

Temperatures there have already risen 2 C in the past 50 years. They are predicted to rise at least another three degrees by the turn of the century, unless things change.

Gwenn Flowers says the ice of the Kaskawulsh glacier is thinning rapidly and losing about a half metre a year. (Susan Ormiston/CBC)

Yukon saw a particularly hot July last summer, the warmest in five years with several heat warnings issued.

Leading climate change scientists recently warned that the world has only a dozen years to slow the warming of the planet or risk worse drought, floods, and extreme heat. The authors of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change say urgent and unprecedented changes are needed to keep global warming under 1.5 C.

"What the glaciers and ice sheets do makes a big difference to global sea levels, and makes a big difference to local environments where they form a water source," Flowers says.

Around Kluane Lake, two research stations are monitoring the changes in Yukon's climate and glaciers.

Andy Williams came to the area more than 40 years ago to manage the Kluane Lake Research Station. He also founded a small airline service ferrying scientists, hikers and tourists into the icefields.

He's observed enormous changes in the ice over that time. While glaciers naturally advance and retreat, he says, it's "not at this speed."

And the changes in this region reflect what is also happening in the Andes, or the Himalayas, "where there are millions of people relying on a steady flow from glaciers to provide irrigation and drinking water." If those shrink too fast, "the results are catastrophic," he says.

The more rapid thinning of the big ice in Yukon is already causing dramatic consequences further down the mountains, like in the jewel-like Kluane Lake, Yukon's largest, which borders Kluane National Park and Reserve, a UNESCO World Heritage site.

For 300 years, glacial runoff was the major water source for Kluane Lake, flowing in by way of the Slims River. But in May 2016, Kluane Lake levels dropped precipitously. The problem was a case of "river piracy" — incredibly rare, and hugely significant. The terminus or end of the Kaskawulsh glacier had receded enough that a glacial lake that fed the Slims River suddenly drained when the glacier outflow found a new direction to a new river.

It left the Slims River with little water as it made its way down the mountain to Kluane Lake.

Bob Dickson, the chief of Kluane First Nation, stands on the dry bed of what used to be a glacier-fed river. (Susan Ormiston/CBC)

That summer Kluane Lake dropped 1.7 metres, and its levels remain low.

In the Kluane First Nation communities of Burwash and Destruction Bay, the shoreline retreated, restricting boat access to traditional fishing spots. Previous spawning areas for whitefish and trout have popped up above the water line.

"We can't change it," says Bob Dickson, the chief.

"We have to live with this lake in a different way. Hunting areas, fishing areas, all are changing. So we have to learn all over again."

The Alaska Highway, one of the great northern routes from Yukon to Alaska, bisects the Slims River valley. Now huge dust storms often obscure the road, forcing camper vans to slow to a crawl. The riverbed, normally covered in water in late August, looks parched.

A camper drives through a dust storm on the Alaska Highway where it bisects the Slims River valley. The dust is from a dried river bed that used to be fed by the Kaskawulsh glacier.

"You can have dust storms where this whole valley is full of dust, and that's all of the glacier flour, it's just blowing it," says Chief Dickson. "They're really terrible, you can't even see."

Parks Canada is monitoring the "unprecedented" changes.

"We're seeing a 20 per cent difference in area coverage of the glaciers in Kluane National Park and Reserve and the rest of the UNESCO World Heritage site [over a 60-year period]," says Diane Wilson, a field unit superintendent at Parks Canada.

"We've never seen that. It's outside the scope of normal.

"Kluane is is an icon. People are so excited to come and visit this wonderful place, but they should know that it's changing. Climate change knows no boundaries."

With files from Mia Sheldon. Thumbnail: The Kaskawulsh glacier in the Yukon's St. Elias Mountain region, often referred to as a 'highway of ice.' (Susan Ormiston/CBC)

This article was original posted on CBC.ca by Susan Ormiston.

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #294 on: October 31, 2018, 02:19:30 AM »
IN PHOTOS: First real snowfall for many Ontarians

Sunday, October 28, 2018, 3:34 PM -    A chilly October is winding down with a shot of snow for parts of Ontario this weekend -- with some of actually accumulating in higher-elevation areas, and parts of eastern Ontario and cottage country.

For some, in fact, it's the first shot of snow so far this season, short-lived though it may be for most. It was enough for a few collisions to be reported on area highways, as the snow caught people off guard before many would have had their winter tires installed.

https://www.theweathernetwork.com/news/articles/southern-ontario-snow-storm-rain-cold-sleet-travel/115907

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #295 on: November 01, 2018, 02:15:31 AM »
Yesterday's hot and cold spots ...

Hot spot in Ontario: 13.7 °C  56.7 °F Point Pelee

Cold spot in Ontario: -9.1 °C  15.6 °F Timmins Victor Power Airport

Hot spot in Canada: 16.1 °C  61.0 °F St. John's West AAFC, NL

Cold spot in Canada: -23.7 °C  -10.7 °F Ivvavik National Park, YT

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #296 on: November 05, 2018, 02:50:00 AM »
Pacific storm brings weather warnings across B.C.

Environment Canada says there will be heavy rain, snow and strong winds for several regions
CBC News · Posted: Nov 03, 2018 7:31 PM PT
Up to 60 millimetres of rain could fall in parts of Metro Vancouver overnight Saturday.

Environment Canada has issued several weather warnings for regions across B.C. as the agency says a Pacific storm is being fuelled by subtropical moisture.

A rainfall warning is in effect for several areas along the South Coast.

Up to 60 millimetres of rain is expected over Howe Sound and parts of Metro Vancouver, the Fraser Valley, including Abbotsford overnight Saturday and into Sunday morning.

Rain is expected to ease Sunday morning according to Environment Canada.

The agency is warning that heavy downpours can cause flash flooding.

On Friday, crews at Grouse Mountain in North Vancouver cleaned up mud from a parking lot after heavy rainfall triggered a slide.

Environment Canada has also issued snowfall warnings for areas of B.C. Peace region, the north west, Kootenays and Southern Interior.

Strong winds are also expected along the western portions of Vancouver Island, the Southern Gulf Island and Greater Victoria as part of the storm.

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #297 on: November 07, 2018, 03:05:57 AM »
Ontario: Big wind prompts warning, risk of outages, closures

Tuesday, November 6, 2018, 8:30 AM -    Weather statements and warnings are widespread across southern Ontario with a strong system set to bring damaging winds to the region on Tuesday. Not only are buildings and powerlines in jeopardy, but drivers are being urged to brace for quickly changing road conditions due to high winds. More on how strong these winds will get, plus a look at the WINTER driving headaches that follow late week, below.

RAIN WITH AN ISOLATED THUNDERSTORM RISK

Quick on the heels of Monday's widespread rain showers is a second and stronger system tracking through southern Ontario on Tuesday. The low deepens as it pushes from Ontario into Quebec, as colder air feeds in on the back side of the system and a strong jet stream increases instability.

Rain, heavy at times, will move through the Greater Toronto Area and westward, into cottage country and across the Nickel Belt through the day Tuesday. A general 5-10 mm is expected across the lower Great Lakes with closer to 20 mm toward Huron and Georgian Bay. There's also a risk of an isolated embedded thunderstorm, which could enhance rainfall amounts in some areas.

The bulk of the rain is expected to track through eastern Ontario and southern Quebec through Tuesday afternoon and evening with wrap around showers lingering into southern and central regions for Tuesday night.

The greater impact with Tuesday's mild rain system will be the powerful winds with widespread gusts to 70 km/h expected, but between 80-90 km/h gusts along exposed sections of the lake shore. Couple that with an already saturated ground, and that could spell trouble for power outages across parts of the region.

Tuesday's wind threat prompted Environment Canada to issue special weather statements and warnings across the region.

"Damage to buildings, such as to roof shingles and windows, may occur. Loose objects may be tossed by the wind and cause injury or damage," warns EC.

Drivers may also face a challenging commute and "changing road conditions" due to the high winds.

While winds remain gusty through Tuesday night and into Wednesday morning, they'll likely fall below "damaging wind" criteria by that time frame.

By Wednesday, colder weather will spread back into the region along with a strong and gusty northwest wind, which will in turn help to produce some lake-effect snow showers southeast of Lake Huron and Georgian Bay. Both the wind and lake-effect flurries are set to taper by Thursday, although temperatures remain on the cool side of seasonal.

LAST GUARANTEE FOR JUST RAIN WITH A STORM?

Monday brought showers and milder temperatures to southern Ontario, with highs edging into the double-digits for some spots. That warmth will be with us for at least one more day as daytime highs bump into the low-to-mid teens once again.

Soggy pattern or not, many southern Ontarians have been thinking, at least this is just rain and not snow, right? The recent storms that have hit the region with back-to-back wet days have taken a more northerly track, allowing milder air to surge into southern and central Ontario and allowing for the precipitation to fall as rain. But as we head towards the winter season, we'll start to see more reinforcing shots of colder, arctic air with a storm track further to the south and precipitation falling as snow instead of rain. Is this the 'rain to snow' turning point? Read on for more.

On Friday, another system will track into the Great Lakes region as we closely watch how temperatures could make for some messy weather across the Golden Horseshoe.

"Temperatures will be above freezing across most of the region and rain will likely dominate for areas below the escarpment," says Weather Network meteorologist Dr. Doug Gillham. "However, wet snow mixed with rain is expected for areas north of the 401/407, especially above the escarpment and across cottage country with a few centimetres of snow possible."

The rain and mixed precipitation are expected to end as wet snow across most of the region by Friday evening.

Bands of lake-effect snow are likely once again east of Lake Huron and Georgian Bay through the weekend as we face the coldest weather of the season so far with temperatures much more typical of December.

"And we are closely watching the track of the next system, which will approach the Great Lakes region early next week with temperatures cold enough to give us the potential for some snow," says Gillham, adding that temperatures next week will be much colder than normal and more typical of early to mid December for most of the week.

We're talking "exceptionally" cold temperatures for early to mid November and that rapid decline is thanks in part to some of the coldest air on the other side of the planet.

"A pocket of the coolest air in the world (Siberia) is swirling and a part of that breaks off and slides down to northern Canada this week," explains Tyler Hamilton, another meteorologist at The Weather Network. "It swipes the eastern Prairies and ultimately that cool upper trough will locate itself right over Ontario."

Not only does it bring in the colder air, it's also the perfect recipe to ignite the "lake-effect snow engine."

"We'll continue to see that signal through this upcoming weekend, so be prepared for some very heavy snow at times in the traditional snowbelt areas and we can't rule out snow in the Greater Toronto Area in the next couple of weeks either," Hamilton says.

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #298 on: November 08, 2018, 02:52:49 AM »
Strong winds in London and surrounding area prompt special weather statement

Environment Canada has issued a special weather statement for London and the surrounding area, warning of strong winds in the forecast Tuesday afternoon and evening.

The weather agency says strong southwesterly winds might gust up to 80 kilometers an hour through London, Parkhill, Strathroy, Komoka, and Middlesex County.

The winds are expected to gradually weaken overnight, but until then residents are warned that loose objects and tree branches getting tossed around by the the gusts could cause injury or damage.

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #299 on: November 09, 2018, 02:36:52 AM »
Yesterday's November 7th hot and cold spots ...

Hot spot in Ontario: 11.7 °C  53.1 °F Moose Creek Wells

Cold spot in Ontario: -15.4 °C  4.3 °F Muskrat Dam Airport

Hot spot in Canada: 17.5 °C  63.5 °F Chéticamp, NS

Cold spot in Canada: -34.8 °C  -30.6 °F Mould Bay, NT


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