Author Topic: Weather in Canada 2018  (Read 107631 times)

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #260 on: September 25, 2018, 12:46:36 AM »
TORNADO OUTBREAK | Ottawa and Quebec
 CONFIRMED: Two tornadoes, two downbursts hit Ottawa region
https://www.theweathernetwork.com/news/articles/gatineau-ottawa-dunrobin-tornado-storm/112859

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #261 on: September 26, 2018, 01:08:39 AM »

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #262 on: September 27, 2018, 01:09:29 AM »
ATLANTIC CANADA | Soggy week
Flood risk for the Maritimes, 'ghost of Florence' follows
FLOODING risk developing this week, timing out the heavy rains here

Wednesday, September 25, 2018, 7:26 PM -    Widespread special weather statements cover New Brunswick and Nova Scotia with heavy amounts of rain expected over a short period of time. Following this midweek drenching, we're keeping a close eye on what could become a subtropical or tropical system from the remnants of Florence, which could bring more rain to southern areas of the Maritimes late week. More on the "ghost of Florence" and the cooling pattern that follows, below.

WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS:
    Great Lakes system pushes rain showers into the Maritimes continuing through Wednesday
    Special weather statements issued ahead of the rainfall where over 50 mm is possible
    Cold front tracks through Wednesday afternoon, bringing threat for scattered thunderstorms across the Maritimes

MIDWEEK DRENCHING
A low pressure system approaching from the Great Lakes will bring rain into New Brunswick through Tuesday evening, spreading through Nova Scotia during the overnight hours and lasting into Thursday afternoon.
Rainfall amounts may reach or exceed rainfall warning levels of 50 mm in 24 hours, especially for southern New Brunswick and western mainland Nova Scotia, according to Environment Canada.
"As the cold front tracks through Wednesday evening, there will be the risk of thunderstorms," adds The Weather Network meteorologist Nadine Hinds-Powell. "Any threat of stronger storms will be across extreme northwestern New Brunswick."

GHOST OF FLORENCE' THREATENS ATLANTIC REGION
A week ago the remnants of Hurricane Florence tracked south of the Maritimes and brought locally heavy rain to southwestern Nova Scotia. As the storm headed out to sea, part of the system were left behind and has been meandering in the Atlantic well off the East Coast of the U.S. for the past week. This fragment of Florence has grown and become more organized over the past week and the U.S. National Hurricane Center is closely monitoring the potential for this system to meet the criteria to become a subtropical or tropical storm.

"This system is currently located east of the Carolinas," says Weather Network meteorologist Dr. Doug Gillham. "During Wednesday and Thursday, some of the upper level moisture from this system will get drawn into the system that will track across Atlantic Canada. This tropical moisture will enhance rain-fall from the non-tropical system."On Friday, the area of low pressure at the surface from the remnants of Florence is expected to track south of Nova Scotia and it could clip the coastline with some showers.

"However, despite its long and high impact history, there is no cause for alarm," adds Gillham. "The ghost of Florence will be a rather weak system as it tracks out to sea for the second time."

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #263 on: September 28, 2018, 12:47:58 AM »
Canada Winter Forecast Calls For Mild Fall, Smooth Transition To Cold: Weather Network
Canadians "won't see the sudden drop into winter as we normally do."

Canadians can expect to enjoy a full fall season with a steady transition to winter over the next two months, The Weather Network forecasts.

The network is predicting that winter won't come early this year and that Canadians will get to experience an overall mild fall from now until the end of November.

"Our forecast team at The Weather Network is seeing this fall as a less roller-coaster ride than we normally see as we go from summer into winter," said The Weather Network's chief meteorologist, Chris Scott.

"Fall is one of those transition seasons where it is a wild roller-coaster ride. We are going to see some weeks where it's warm and some weeks that are cold, but this year it's not quite the steepness of the drops and rises we sometimes see this time of the year."
https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2018/09/17/canada-winter-forecast-weather-network_a_23529731/

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #264 on: September 29, 2018, 01:08:31 AM »
SEVERE WEATHER PREPARATIONS
TORNADOES IN CANADA: Expert debunks common myths

Not all thunderstorms produce tornadoes, but it's crucial to be ready

Wednesday, September 26, 2018, 4:58 PM -    In light of last week's destructive tornadoes in the Ottawa region, it is more important than ever to be aware of the dangers posed by one of nature’s most powerful forces. When natural disasters strike, the best defense is to be both well informed and well prepared.

With that in mind, here are a few common myths and misconceptions about tornadoes in Canada, as well as the correct information and the preparedness steps that may help save your life.

MYTH: TORNADOES DON'T HAPPEN OFTEN IN CANADA
While it is true that Canada sees far fewer tornadoes than the United States, Canada is still one of the most tornado-prone countries in the world, with over 60 tornadoes confirmed each year on average. Note: a study involving Environment Canada and Western University called the Northern Tornadoes Project suggests this number to be underestimated, as many northern regions do see tornadoes but they go unnoticed in unpopulated regions.

The Prairies and southern Ontario and Quebec see the highest tornado risk every year, but almost all populated places in Canada can potentially be affected by tornadoes. As the map below shows, tornadoes have occurred in every province, from B.C. to Newfoundland.

MYTH: TORNADOES ONLY HAPPEN IN THE SUMMER
Tornadoes are fueled by atmospheric instability, which means they are most common when temperatures are warmer. That being the case, it’s not surprising that we see the most tornadoes during the warm season. July is Canada’s most active tornado month. But just because tornadoes are more common in summer, does not mean that they aren’t possible at other times of year. Tornadoes can occur any time when there is enough instability in the atmosphere to fuel supercell storms, regardless of the calendar.

MYTH: TORNADOES ONLY HAPPEN DURING THE DAY
This point is very similar to the one above. Because tornadoes are fueled by atmospheric instability, they occur most often at the warmest times of the day. Most tornadoes happen between 4:00pm and 8:00pm. But it’s important to know that the atmospheric conditions that produce tornadoes can occur at any time of day, and even through the overnight hours. Nighttime, or “nocturnal” tornadoes are often more deadly than daytime tornadoes, in part because they are more difficult to see in the dark, and also because they often strike while people are sleeping.

MYTH: TORNADOES DON'T HIT LARGE CITIES
Despite this common misconception, urban areas are just as likely to be hit by tornadoes as anywhere else. The reason that more tornadoes affect rural areas is simply that rural areas make up such a large percentage of the overall land area. By size, urban areas are simply a relatively smaller target, and so less likely to be hit. However as urban areas continue to expand over time, they become more and more likely to be affected by tornadoes. As just a few examples, Windsor, ON, Vaughn, ON, and most recently the Ottawa area have all been struck by destructive tornadoes.

MYTH: TORNADOES CAN'T CROSS MOUNTAINS, RIVERS, LAKES, HIGHWAYS
This is one of the most common tornado misunderstandings, but it has no basis in fact. There is no natural or manmade barrier that will disrupt the path of a tornado. This includes mountain ridges, rivers, valleys, lakes, and highways. There is abundant evidence of tornadoes crossing any and all of these features without any interruption at all to the damage path. Once again as a recent example, last week’s EF-3 tornado crossed the Ottawa river from Dunrobin to Gatineau.

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #265 on: September 30, 2018, 01:11:32 AM »
Record B.C. wildfire season inflamed by hot, dry and lightning-filled weather

Environment Canada numbers show summer was hotter and drier than normal across the province
CBC News · Posted: Sep 28, 2018 4:00 AM PT | Last Updated: September 28
More area in B.C. burned this summer than any year on record. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press)

Lightning, heat and desiccation — these are the weather conditions that helped fuel another record-breaking wildfire season in B.C.

Environment Canada has compiled its seasonal summary for the summer, which saw about 13,500 square kilometres of the province go up in flames, the largest total on record.

    'Not even close to enough': After 15 years of warnings, B.C. far behind on wildfire prevention

Across the province, the weather was hotter and drier than normal, a result of persistent high pressure ridges that parked over the province for days at a time, according to a presentation from government meteorologists.

Kelowna, for example, had less than half its normal amount of rain between June and August. The city's average temperature during the same time was 20.3 C, compared to a normal of 18.6 C.

It was Terrace's third driest summer on record and Prince George's fourth.

    The future looks grim after 2 years of devastating B.C. wildfires

On the coast, a week-long stretch of hot weather beginning on July 24 brought temperatures of five to eight degrees above normal. On July 30 alone, 11 cities broke all-time extreme temperature records, with highs of up to 40 C.

The province also saw an above-average total of 256,050 lightning strikes between April and August. That includes more than 20,000 lightning strikes in a single day on Aug. 11.
A graph from Environment Canada shows a big spike in the number of smoke hours in some B.C. cities during the 2017 and 2018 wildfire seasons. (Environment Canada)

Meanwhile, smoke from wildfires in B.C. caused 60 days of air quality advisories across western Canada, all the way to Manitoba. Four B.C. cities — Penticton, Williams Lake, Cranbrook and Victoria.— saw more than 300 hours of smoke.

Looking ahead, Environment Canada forecasters say they have moderate confidence of a warmer than normal fall.

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #266 on: October 01, 2018, 02:21:23 AM »
ALBERTA | Rounds of snow
Big push of arctic air, MORE snow for Alberta, risk of 20+cm
Significant snow event to start the work week in heavily populated areas of Alberta

Saturday, September 29, 2018, 3:10 PM -    Here we go again. All the signals are there for moreearly fall snow after parts of the Prairies have already seen record-breaking amounts so far this season. As Arctic air pours in from the north, prepare for a few rounds of weekend snow in Alberta and the risk for significant totals through the first days of October as well. More on the timing and impact, below.

WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS:
    Record-breaking western ridgestrengthens and builds northward into Alaska resulting in colder air pouring into the Prairies
    A couple of lows track across the region bringing more snow to the Alberta foothills and Rockies through the weekend
    Temperatures stay cold through the weekend with a combination of Arctic air from Greenland and some cross polar flow from Siberia
    Widespread snowfall potential next week across southern and central Alberta

An Arctic trough has sent temperatures falling across Alberta once again, with some communities reporting snowfall on Thursday and temperatures near negative territory Friday morning. An extended period of cold weather continues across the Prairies for the final days of September.

During the weekend, more snow is expected for the Rockies and Foothills, which will spread across much of southern Alberta by Sunday. The snow will come in phases through the first days of early October as well with amounts will really start to ramp up for some southwestern regions.

"Totals will continue to build with the second upsloping snow event Saturday through Sunday around Pincher Creek, Lake Louise and up to Hinton with a shot of snow possibly spilling into Calgary's metro region by Monday," says Weather Network meteorologist Tyler Hamilton. "But it's areas like Pincher Creek that could pick up in excess of 20 cm of snow through Monday, with more snowfall ahead."

Another round of moisture and coinciding shot of Arctic air clash over southern Alberta next Monday through Wednesday, bringing a period of snowfall across much of central and southern Alberta.

While it is still too early to make predictions on accumulations or exact locations/timing, general consensus is that snowfall becomes more common away from the Rockies on Monday, increasing in intensity and spreading east and south Tuesday through Wednesday. There is even the risk for another round late next week, but we will continuing to track that after we get through the first initial rounds of snow.

LONG RANGE OUTLOOK
As we move into the heart of October, the Gulf of Alaska ridge should eventually begin to assert itself more, leading to warmer and drier conditions for B.C. Alberta is likely to remain on the dividing line between these two regimes, resulting in continued active weather and back-and-forth swings in temperatures. There is the potential however, for some milder weather to spread into Alberta towards the Thanksgiving long weekend and beyond.

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #267 on: October 02, 2018, 02:15:29 AM »
Wild B.C. weather prompts warnings, special statements from Environment Canada 

Metro Vancouver facing rainfall warning, while B.C. mountain passes could get a dump of snow
CBC News · Posted: Sep 30, 2018 6:39 PM PT | Last Updated: 11 hours ago
Snow can be seen accumulating along Highway 97 at the Begbie Summit south of 100 Mile House B.C. on Sunday, Sept. 30, 2018. Environment Canada has issued a special weather statement regarding snowfall for the area. (Government of British Columbia)

A rainfall warning has been issued for Metro Vancouver, while some B.C. mountain passes could face an early season dump of snow according to Environment Canada.

Rain is expected to be heavy. Up to 60 millimetres could fall in parts of Metro Vancouver and Howe Sound by Monday morning, said an alert from Environment Canada issued Sunday.

There are 10 regions — with high mountain passes — facing special weather statements for the potential of snow accumulation. Those highways include the Coquihalla, the Trans-Canada Highway and Highway 3.

Meanwhile, there is a snowfall warning for up to 10 centimetres of snow for the Chilcotin and up to 30 centimetres of snow by Tuesday for Yoho and Kootenay Park.

The province requires passenger vehicles to be equipped with winter tires between Oct. 1 and March 31 on many rural highways and high mountain passes in the Interior, North and Vancouver Island.

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #268 on: October 03, 2018, 01:21:31 AM »
Environment Canada issues weather statement as Halifax could get really, really wet
By StaffStarMetro Halifax
Mon., Oct. 1, 2018

HALIFAX—Cover up those plants in anticipation of a frosty overnight Monday and then batten down the hatches for heavy rain expected late Tuesday into Wednesday.

Environment Canada has issued a frost advisory for Monday night, advising people that “clearing skies and light winds will allow temperatures to drop to near the freezing mark in low lying areas overnight.”

A special weather statement is also in effect for Halifax thanks to a low pressure system approaching the Maritimes on Tuesday that’s expected to track across the Maritimes on Wednesday.

The federal weather agency advises that rain, at times heavy, will develop over the southwestern half of the province on Tuesday evening and is forecast to continue on Wednesday.

Total rainfall amounts may reach or exceed 50 millimetres by Wednesday evening over parts of the province.

As of Monday afternoon, Environment Canada was calling for rain and a high of 19 C for Wednesday.

After that, it looks to be mostly sun and cloud with seasonable temperatures, although the wet weather may return for the Thanksgiving long weekend.

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #269 on: October 04, 2018, 01:54:43 AM »
Yesterday's October 2 hot and cold spots ...

Hot spot in Prince Edward Island: 14.3 °C  57.7 °F Summerside

Cold spot in Prince Edward Island: 2.8 °C  37.0 °F Charlottetown Airport

Hot spot in Canada: 23.7 °C  74.7 °F Point Pelee, ON

Cold spot in Canada: -22.8 °C  -9.0 °F Eureka, NU

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #270 on: October 05, 2018, 02:07:45 AM »
Baby, it's cold outside: Communities across B.C. smash cold weather records

It was a record-breaking 2 C at the Vancouver International Airport Wednesday morning
CBC News · Posted: Oct 03, 2018 4:23 PM PT | Last Updated: October 3
Temperatures dropped across B.C., in some cases to record lows, due to a frigid air mass blanketing the province. (Tiplyashina Evgeniya/Shutterstock )

A frigid air mass has blanketed British Columbia, smashing years-old temperature records and dumping snow across the province.

At Vancouver International Airport, the temperature dipped to 2 C Wednesday morning, breaking a temperature record set in 1937.

There were other records broken across the province, including Prince George where temperatures dipped to -12.1 C, breaking the previous record of -9.4 C set in 1950.

Across B.C., daytime highs will be five to 10 degrees below the seasonal average.

There is one silver lining: the cold will be accompanied by sunny skies which are expected to last until the end of the week.
Drivers advised to prepare for snow

The same cold front which brought in the partly Arctic air mass also brought snow to B.C.'s Interior and Calgary earlier this week.

    Record snowfall wallops Calgary in 1st storm of season

Sheridan Lake got 45 centimetres of snow, while Rogers Pass got 32 centimetres.

Kurtis Strelau, director of education with the Young Drivers of Canada, said the snow is an important reminder to get prepared for winter driving conditions.

This means winterizing your vehicle, not just with snow tires — which are mandatory across some B.C. highways — but also with winter coolant, windshield wiper fluid and lights.
A map highlights the major routes where mud and snow tires are required. Drivers that go without could be prevented from travelling and face a $109 fine. (CBC)

Another tip? Know that everything will likely take longer.

"You really have to plan for more time," Strelau said. "There's a bunch of proactive stuff you can do to know that you are safe."

Offline mark

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Record snowfall wallops Calgary.
« Reply #271 on: October 05, 2018, 08:27:06 AM »
Heres the Calgary news Paul.

Not just for the day, but for the entire month of October.
_________________

2 Oct 2018 – A record-breaking 15 to 25 cm of snow fell in Calgary overnight, said CBC meteorologist Christy Climenhaga. The previous record for Oct. 2 was set in 1954 with only about five cm.

“But the all-time extreme record for one day in October is about 30 centimetres (12 inches) in 1914, so you guys are on your way to breaking that,” said Climenhaga.

By 4:30 p.m., parts of the city had reported 40 cm (16 inches), the city said in a release.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/calgary-weather-snow-oct-2-1.4846725

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #272 on: October 06, 2018, 02:15:49 AM »
Neighbour came back from visiting their son and family in Calgary a few days ago, and were glad to get back to Ontario - where I was on the roof in short sleeves setting up my new sun recorder :)

This Province Broke 39 New Weather Records In One Day, Proving The Weather In Canada Right Now Is Just Insane


British Columbia has received up to 60 cm of snow.
Canada's weather has been all over the place lately and the only thing that's certain is how unpredictable it is. In some provinces, like Alberta and B.C., there's already up to 60 cm of snowfall. In others, such as Ontario, there's 20 something degree weather and summer is still going strong.

https://www.narcity.com/ca/bc/vancouver/news/this-province-broke-39-new-weather-records-in-one-day-proving-the-weather-in-canada-right-now-is-just-insane

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #273 on: October 07, 2018, 02:21:59 AM »
Abnormal 'Weather Bomb' underway; wind gusts of 140 km/h

Friday, October 5, 2018, 8:31 AM -    We are only days into the month of October and many across the west are digging out from a foot of snowfall. But what's interesting is that the strongest storm that we've seen in months is only now underway, with heavy snowfall, far-reaching winds and blizzard conditions for some Canadians.

While all of this winter weather is going down, other parts of our country have been basking in sunshine and muggy, summer-like weather. How can this happen?

WHAT IS A WEATHER BOMB?
A 'weather bomb' is an unofficial term for a low pressure system that’s central pressure falls 24 millibars in 24 hours. This process is known as explosive cyclogenesis or "bombogenesis" and is currently ongoing across parts of Canada.

WHY IS THAT A BIG DEAL?
The lower the central pressure, the stronger the storm. The deeper the low becomes, the more intense its wind field will be. For example, in a hurricane the central pressure drops to extreme low levels. Back in October of 1979, Typhoon Tip's pressure dropped to a staggering 870 mb in the western Pacific Ocean and still holds the lowest pressure recorded by a tropical cyclone. While we won't come close to this type of pressure, it's the rapid intensification (in combination with a couple of other fact that will generate destructive hurricane-force wind gusts (over 119 km/h).

EFFECTS SO FAR
    Rapid cyclogenesis began Wednesday night through Thursday across western Quebec; central pressure dropped 40 mb drop in 24 hours
    Temperatures across southern Ontario peaked into the 20s on Thursday; will rise again through Thanksgiving
    Gusts over 90 km/h were reported in parts of northern Ontario and Quebec Thursday
    Gusts over 110 km/h in Iqaluit, power outages reported in town
    Wind warnings in northern Quebec, eastern Labrador and southern Baffin Island; gusts 100-140 km/h Friday

TIMING AND IMPACTS
The storm began its story across northern Ontario Wednesday night through Thursday as it intensified into Quebec, where it officially attained its 'weather bomb' status. On Friday, the storm had deepened even further and is affecting a large portion of northern Canada, from northern Quebec, Labrador and Nunavut. A large swath of snow will blanket areas from James Bay, Hudson Bay, up to Baffin Island including Iqaluit and the Labrador coast. While there will be snow, it's the winds that will be the fierce part of the storm.

As the low swirls overhead Friday, visibility within snow bands will drop to near zero as hurricane-force wind gusts of 120 km/h whip around. For southern Baffin Island, some gusts could exceed 140 km/h before the storm departs and shifts east into the Labrador Sea on Saturday. Power outages have already been reported across the region from Thursday night.
IS THIS NORMAL?

While residents in northern Canada are no strangers to powerful blizzards, the climatological statistics of a low this deep so early in the season is not common.

"Sub 950 mb extratropical lows are very rare, especially this early in the season," says Chris Doyle, a retired meteorologist from British Columbia. "[Below is] an ensemble forecast and climatological return period. So with respect to recent [climatology in the last 30 years] it hasn't happened."

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #274 on: October 08, 2018, 02:20:44 AM »
Ontario: Cooldown and storms, but RECORD HEAT next

Saturday, October 6, 2018, 8:55 PM -    Rumbles of thunder accompanied rising temperatures back into southern Ontario on Saturday, in a subtle warm up after a freezing Friday morning. But warmer temperatures -- and near-record humidex values -- are still ahead, as Ontarians may be giving thanks for a blast of summer-like warmth by the end of the holiday long weekend. We take a look at the complicated temperature trend, and who still has a risk for storms, below.

LINGERING RUMBLES
Severe storms sweeping through the southwest Saturday evening will continue skimming across the lower Great Lakes into the overnight hours, gradually losing intensity with time. Locally heavy downpours are the main risk with these overnight storms.

Sunday looks to be a mostly cloudy day, with the threat for showers lingering here and there -- mainly across the Niagara Peninsula -- but most of the day will be rain-free.

The next major storm system with its eyes on Ontario will lift north into the Nickel Belt and beyond, taking most of the rain and thunder threat well north with it. That doesn't mean we won't see any effects in the south, however, as warm, humid air floods back into the region, starting on Thanksgiving Monday.

"For most of the GTA this means that a southeast wind off of Lake Ontario will hold temperatures in the upper teens," says Weather Network meteorologist Dr. Doug Gillham. "Meanwhile, summer-like weather will spread into southern Niagara and into areas west of the GTA with temperatures reaching into the mid 20s with a humidex in the low to mid 30s."

RECORD BREAKING WARMTH AHEAD: WILL THE TRUE AUTUMNAL WEATHER EVER ARRIVE?
By Tuesday there's confidence for more summer-like weather with all time humidex records in jeopardy. High temperatures are expected to reach the mid to upper 20s feeling closer to the mid 30s with the humidity.

The reason for this trend and the delay of a cooler more autumnal pattern is due to an upper level ridge across the southeastern portions of the continent, which continues to have much more fight to it than what long range guidance expected. This will be the case for next week as another anomalously strong upper level ridge sets up along the eastern seaboard. This results in a surface pattern, as shown below, with a strong area of high pressure over the eastern portions of the continent and generally lower pressure across the central portions. This allows subtropical air to push up from the Caribbean spreading into southern and central Ontario.

By Tuesday and through the remainder of next week, temperatures across much of the province are expected to run anywhere from about 5°C to nearly 12°C above average for this time of year. The warmest air is expected to be focused across southern portions of the province through the 401 corridor. Tuesday and Wednesday are expected to be the two mildest days overall with highs forecast to be into the mid to high twenties with humidex values running into the low to mid-thirties.

As we head into next weekend this pattern looks to change back over to a more autumnal pattern as long range guidance starts to weaken the ridge in the east and the trough pushes eastward. This will result in a fall storm setting up to end next week and will usher in a more autumnal pattern with temperatures getting back to seasonal or even below. The timing of when the fall storm pushes through is still yet to be determined as long-range guidance varies on this.

The question is, does the cooler more seasonal air stick around? Some teleconnection patterns and overall trend setting up does lean toward yes, but the upper level ridge across the southeast still lingers. This could give the odd push of milder air into extreme portions of southern Ontario at times, typical of fall, but overall the trend does look cooler for the province.

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #275 on: October 10, 2018, 04:03:16 AM »
Summer-like weather in Southern Ontario but change coming to Northern Ontario
Mix of freezing rain, snow to arrive in northwestern Ontario on Tuesday

Environment Canada issued a number of special weather statements on Tuesday morning
CBC News · Posted: Oct 09, 2018 10:26 AM ET | Last Updated: 33 minutes ago
Environment Canada has issued weather warnings for much of northwestern Ontario on Tuesday with heavy rain and snow expected to fall until Thursday. (Associated Press)

Residents throughout northwestern Ontario will experience some wet, messy weather this week according to Environment Canada.

A number of special weather statements were issued across the region early Tuesday morning as a low pressure system moves over the southern states and heads northwest toward Lake Superior.

According to Environment Canada, snow or a mix of wet snow and rain is expected to arrive on Tuesday night and as the temperature drops to near or below zero on Wednesday morning, snow may be mixed with ice pellets as well.

Thunder Bay, the Superior West region and along the north shore can expect to see up to 50 mm of rain until Wednesday night, while residents in regions like Fort Frances and north of Lake Nipigon could see approximately 10 to 20 cm of snow on Wednesday and into Thursday.

Poor winter driving conditions are expected and motorists should be prepared to adjust travel plans accordingly.

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #276 on: October 11, 2018, 01:24:27 AM »
https://www.theweathernetwork.com/news/articles/northern-ontario-strong-fall-storm-heavy-rain-snow-dangerous-winter-driving-fort-frances-dryden-armstrong-fort-hope-geraldton-kapuskasing/114739

  Yesterday's hot and cold spots ... 

Hot spot in Yukon: 5.7 °C  42.3 °F Haines Junction
Cold spot in Yukon: -19.1 °C  -2.4 °F Dawson
 

  Hot spot in Canada: 29.6 °C  85.3 °F Point Pelee, ON
Cold spot in Canada: -19.1 °C  -2.4 °F Dawson, YT
   

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #277 on: October 12, 2018, 02:02:54 AM »
ATLANTIC CANADA | Hurricane season
Eyeing a Canadian connection as Hurricane Michael races past


Wednesday, October 10, 2018, 5:37 PM -    The Florida Panhandle and parts of the U.S. Southeast will bear the brunt of historic Hurricane Michael, but the extended forecast for this powerful storm takes it back over the open waters of the Atlantic late this week, toward Atlantic Canada. Here’s an update on the future of this powerful storm, including what kinds of impacts we might see here at home.

WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS
    Michael expected to remain largely offshore as it passes Atlantic Canada Friday/Saturday
    Rainfall warnings, weather statements for Maritimes, Newfoundland in effect ahead of fall system Thursday/Friday
    This fall system may tap into moisture from Michael, making for some heavier rainfall

Fortunately, the remnants of Michael are expected to remain well offshore for the most part. Barring a major shift in the storm as it makes its way north, we expect only minimal effects from the storm to clip Atlantic Canada. As the system races past Friday night and Saturday we expect to see some coastal wind gusts, up to 60 km/h, as well as some rough surf along the coast of Nova Scotia.

We're also watching for a swath of rainfall associated with remnants of the storm, which may sweep across eastern Nova Scotia and Newfoundland (particularly the Avalon), especially if the storm tracks any further west than expected. Far from the wall of water that the Florida Panhandle faced, however, this rainfall will be even less than some of our typical fall storms in Atlantic Canada.

While Michael is capturing the headlines, there's actually another system that's more likely to bring heavy rain to the Maritimes; a low pressure system pushing into the region from Quebec, starting on Thursday. This system will be moisture-laden enough on its own to bring some significant rainfall to parts of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

Environment Canada has issued a rainfall warning for southern Nova Scotia, as well as special weather statements across the rest of Nova Scotia and southern New Brunswick, highlighting the concerns for heavy rainfall from this system, as well as the possibility that it will tap into the northward-streaming moisture associated with what remains of Michael. There is still some uncertainty about Michael’s final track, and a slight westward shift would bring more heavy rainfall potential for Canada’s east coast. As such, the warning may be adjusted, or expanded, and residents of the region should continue to monitor alerts along with updates to the forecast.

Offline mark

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Record-breaking cold and snowfall across B.C.
« Reply #278 on: October 12, 2018, 06:48:33 AM »
According to Environment Canada, B.C. broke 39 cold-weather records Wednesday.

These included 14 broken daytime cold records, and 18 overnight lows smashed.

Also, seven new snowfall records were set on Oct. 3. These included 28 cm (almost a foot) of snow in Sparwood, according to meteorologist Matt MacDonald with the national weather agency.

In Clinton, the temperature on Wednesday plunged to -14.2ºC, “smashing the old mark of -5 set in 2012.”

In Prince George, the mercury dipped -12.1ºC, breaking the old record of -9.4 set in 1950.


In the Puntzi Mountain region in the Central Interior the mercury dropped to a bone-chilling -11.6ºC, breaking the old record of -9.1 set in 2013.

The Mackenzie area also set a record -8.5ºC, breaking -5.5 set in 1990.

Even Vancouver saw a record low of 1.6ºC on Wednesday, breaking the previous record of 2.8 in 1937.

Other areas that set cold records were Quesnel (-8.4ºC,) Lytton (-1.2) and Lillooet (-2.9).

https://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/record-breaking-cold-temperatures-recorded-across-b-c

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #279 on: October 14, 2018, 02:39:44 AM »
ATLANTIC CANADA | Hurricane season
Moisture from Michael enhances big rain in Atlantic Canada


Friday, October 12, 2018, 6:17 PM -    What's left of history-making Hurricane Michael -- now a remnant low -- isn't quite finished with its journey in North America, as a band of heavy rain lands a glancing blow on parts of Atlantic Canada through Saturday. While this swath of heavy rain is largely skimming past the region, parts of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland still stand to see some significant accumulations. And that's on top of locally heavy rain that fell Thursday and Friday, courtesy of a separate system. See when we dry out -- and warm up -- below.

WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS:
    Band of heavy rain slides up Nova Scotia coast through Friday night
    Heavy rain moves into eastern Newfoundland, especially the Avalon, overnight Friday through early Saturday
    Rainfall warnings in effect through overnight Friday into Saturday for eastern Nova Scotia/eastern Newfoundland
    Milder temperatures -- ahead of another round of rain -- into early next week

While much of the weekend looks quiet for Atlantic Canada, we have to get through another bout of heavy rain for parts of eastern Nova Scotia and eastern Newfoundland first, as the remnants of Hurricane Michael skirt past. The rain is expected to clear Nova Scotia through the overnight hours, with the Avalon seeing the brunt of what will fall through Saturday morning.

MILD DAYS AHEAD, BUT MORE RAIN ON THE WAY
As we move into the new week, a surge of milder air moves up from the south, making for some comfortable, seasonally warm fall days for the first half of next week. That said, while Monday looks like a mild, if somewhat cloudy day, this push of milder air comes ahead of the next system, set to sweep into the Maritimes by Tuesday. While the odds are we'll see breaks at times, expect to need your umbrella on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Behind this system, we can expect cooler temperatures once again, with highs slightly below seasonal as we head toward the end of the month.


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