Author Topic: Weather in Canada 2018  (Read 106142 times)

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #240 on: September 04, 2018, 01:22:41 AM »
Yesterday's hot and cold spots ...

Hot spot in Prince Edward Island: 25.1 °C  77.2 °F St. Peters

Cold spot in Prince Edward Island: 13.6 °C  56.5 °F St. Peters

Hot spot in Canada: 30.8 °C  87.4 °F Point Pelee, ON

Cold spot in Canada: -8.0 °C  17.6 °F Margaret Lake, YT

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #241 on: September 05, 2018, 12:51:34 AM »
Monday, September 3, 2018, 4:04 PM -    Severe thunderstorms rolled across southern Ontario and Quebec Monday, bringing torrential downpours, intense lightning and powerful winds.

Environment Canada warned of toonie-sized hail in Drummondville and the Eastern Townships. Meanwhile, a line of thunderstorms in southwestern Ontario brought strong winds, causing tree damage in places including, the town of Lakeshore and Niagara-on-the-Lake.

"Heavy downpours with amounts up to 50 millimetrs in an hour are possible and wind gusts to 90 kilometres per hour are also possible," said the weather agency.

Keep on top of active weather by visiting the ALERTS page.

A squall watch was also issued for eastern Lake Erie, with forecasters warning of the possibility of waterspouts.

As of 3:30 p.m. ET Monday, over 2,200 Hydro One customers were without power.

Tuesday will bring the threat for thunderstorms to parts of southern Ontario as the kids head back to school, however, they are expected to be non-severe in nature.

https://www.theweathernetwork.com/news/articles/severe-weather-torrential-downpours-lightning-strong-winds-environment-canada-southern-ontario-quebec-photos-video-tree-damage/111613

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #242 on: September 06, 2018, 12:52:31 AM »
Gordon the latest storm on a well-worn path to Canada

Tuesday, September 4, 2018, 6:07 PM -    Small but potent tropical storm Gordon will crash to shore over the central Gulf Coast late Tuesday, and its extended track takes it on a curving course toward Canada. Gordon won't survive long enough to bring significant impacts to Canada, but it's not because of the track -- other storms on a similar path have made their mark on our history books. We take a look at what we can expect from Gordon, and how the storm compares to its predecessors, below.

While tropical storm Gordon is expected to strengthen -- possibly even reaching hurricane strength -- before making landfall late on Tuesday, that added strength won't save it when it comes to the long trek up through the central United States. Away from the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico, and feeling increased drag from moving over land, the storm is forecast to weaken rapidly to a tropical depression by Wednesday, and a post-tropical low by later this week.

It won't be until later, after it gets scooped up by a low pressure system carving its way across the central U.S., that we can expect any impacts from the storm -- or what's left of it -- in Canada. Long range model guidance has the remnants of the storm merging with this separate low pressure system before this new combined feature beings moving northeastward, toward the Great Lakes, over the weekend. It remains to be seen how far north this system will track, but southern Ontario will likely see at least some rain from it as it moves past the region. 'Some rain' isn't exactly the stuff major storm impacts are made of, but that hasn't stopped other storms from having a more profound effect.

NOT THE FIRST STORM TO PASS THIS WAY

While Gordon's impact on southern Ontario and Quebec is unlikely to be particularly impressive, it's not the first storm to make the journey from the Gulf to our part of the world, and the same can't be said about them. As the map of historical tropical storm and hurricane tracks, below, shows southern Ontario and Quebec see their fair share of leftovers when it comes to tropical activity, even though the region isn't at risk of the direct strikes we sometimes see in Atlantic Canada.

It's no coincidence that the strongest and most memorable tropical systems (or their remnants) that have impacted Ontario and Quebec have been those that made landfall along the Atlantic Coast rather than in the Gulf of Mexico. While the lows have to scale the Appalachians to reach us on this track, it's still a much shorter distance to travel over land, giving storms a better shot to retain their strength, and occasionally even some of their tropical characteristics, by the time they reach the Lower Great Lakes.

The last post-tropical system to skim past southern Ontario was 2017's Nate, which sped by south of lakes Erie and Ontario in early October. That system brought a widespread 15 to 30 mm of rain across southern Ontario.

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #243 on: September 07, 2018, 01:06:29 AM »
Yesterday'sSeptember 5  hot and cold spots ...

Hot spot in Newfoundland and Labrador: 21.6 °C  70.9 °F St. Lawrence

Cold spot in Newfoundland and Labrador: 3.0 °C  37.4 °F Cartwright Airport

Hot spot in Canada: 34.6 °C  94.3 °F CFB Borden, ON

Cold spot in Canada: -8.0 °C  17.6 °F Isachsen, NU; Svartevaeg, NU

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MOOSE JAW HITS THE FLOOR AS 122-YEAR-OLD TEMPERATURE RECORD BROKEN.
« Reply #244 on: September 07, 2018, 09:00:54 AM »
Temperatures plunged to levels never before recorded on Sept 5 across large areas of Saskatchewan yesterday.

A 122-year-old low temperature record in Moose Jaw of -2.2C was broken when the mercury dipped to -2.8C Wednesday morning.

According to Environment Canada, the following places also woke up to record-breaking temps:

Saskatoon at -1.3C broke the 1903 record of -1.1C

Indian Head at -3.3C also broke its 1903 record of -1.7C

Coronach at -2.6C broke 1965 record of -2.2C

Elbow at -1.3C broke record of -1.1C set in 1965

Lucky Lake at -0.9C smashed a 1972 record of +1.1C

And Rockglen at +2.6C broke a record of +3.3C set back in 1975

The reason for the record-breaking conditions was the combination of a high pressure system, clear skies, northerly winds and, of course, the Grand Solar Minimum.

https://electroverse.net/moose-jaw-hits-the-floor-as-122-year-old-temperature-record-broken/

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #245 on: September 08, 2018, 12:57:47 AM »
And then, a little further to the east...

Temperatures broke a record and made for a sweltering day in Toronto Wednesday, but the GTA was not under a heat warning. The temperature hit 33.9 C at Pearson airport Wednesday afternoon, feeling more like 42 with the humidity. Previously, the hottest Sept. 5 was in 1945, when it reached 31.7 CToronto temperature reaches record high, but no heat warning issued
« Last Edit: September 09, 2018, 12:54:18 AM by PaulMy »

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #246 on: September 09, 2018, 01:09:05 AM »
Yesterday's September 7 hot and cold spots ...

Hot spot in Nova Scotia: 24.6 °C  76.3 °F Kejimkujik Park

Cold spot in Nova Scotia: 4.1 °C  39.4 °F Collegeville

Hot spot in Canada: 32.1 °C  89.8 °F Fincastle, AB

Cold spot in Canada: -10.0 °C  14.0 °F Svartevaeg, NU

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #247 on: September 10, 2018, 12:52:52 AM »
Heavy rain and wind expected Sunday
The remnants of Tropical Depression Gordon will send some heavy rain to the GTA on Sunday. Meteorologist Adam Stiles has your full forecast for the weekend.
Sep 07, 2018, 7:01 PM

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #248 on: September 11, 2018, 01:05:31 AM »
Severe Weather Alerts - Toronto, Ontario
Special Weather Statement in effect until 4:47 PM EDT. Source: Environment Canada


Rain continuing today.

Total rainfall amounts in the range of 20 to 30 mm are possible by the time the rain tapers to scattered showers or drizzle later today. The heavy rain will ease this morning for Toronto and areas to the west, and this afternoon or early evening for areas east of Toronto.

If visibility is reduced while driving, turn on your lights and maintain a safe following distance.

This rain is associated with the remnants of Tropical Depression Gordon.

Please continue to monitor alerts and forecasts issued by Environment Canada. To report severe weather, send an email to ONstorm@canada.ca or tweet reports using #ONStorm.

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #249 on: September 12, 2018, 01:24:47 AM »
Yesterday's September 10 hot and cold spots ...

Hot spot in Prince Edward Island: 18.6 °C  65.5 °F Charlottetown Airport

Cold spot in Prince Edward Island: 2.4 °C  36.3 °F Charlottetown Airport

Hot spot in Canada: 28.7 °C  83.7 °F Coronach, SK

Cold spot in Canada: -12.1 °C  10.2 °F Isachsen, NU

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #250 on: September 15, 2018, 01:17:54 AM »
If you think this September in Alberta is cold, you’re right
By Jodi Hughes    Weather Anchor  Global News   

As parts of Alberta deal with the first snowfall of the season, Calgary finds itself in a battle to reach seasonal temperatures.

READ MORE: Say it ain’t snow! Northern Alberta wakes up to winter weather

The first half of September 2018 has been considerably cooler than the same period last year. In fact, there has not been a daytime high this month that was warmer than the corresponding day in 2018.
Temperature comparison for the first two weeks of September in Calgary.

Daytime highs in Calgary typically average between 18 C and 20 C for the first half of the month of September. This year, there will only be six days that meet or exceed that temperature. That same two-period last year had 12 days above seasonal, with eight days above 25 C.

Mixed precipitation is expected to move into the Calgary area as early as Thursday, but the majority of it won’t likely stick to roads and sidewalks.

Special weather statements were issued by Environment Canada on Tuesday for areas of central Alberta warning of winter-like weather for the middle of the week.

    “A cold air mass from the Northwest Territories has invaded northern Alberta and will continue to push south over the next couple of days.”

As of 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, regions closer to Jasper remain under a snowfall warning with snowfall accumulations of between 10 to 15 centimeters possible.

Forecast highs for Calgary for the end of the week are expected to be 13 C below seasonal, peaking at just 5 C. The last time Calgary had a temperature that cold this early in September was in 2014.

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #251 on: September 16, 2018, 01:00:03 AM »
Florence: Remnants to drench Atlantic Canada next week

theweathernetwork.com   

Friday, September 14, 2018, 5:43 PM -    After swiping through much of eastern North America, what was once Hurricane Florence will make one more stop on its way back out to the ocean, with the storm remnants taking aim on Atlantic Canada for the middle of next week. While the storm's impacts on the region will be minor when compared to the devastating flooding being experienced across the U.S. Southeast, Maritimes residents will still want to keep an eye on this one when planning for next week. We take a look at how much rain to expect and when, as well as a look at the last weekend of summer, below.

(COMING SOON: 2018 FALL FORECAST AND A SNEAK PEEK AT WINTER. DON'T MISS THIS ALL DAY EVENT ON MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17)
WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS:

    Warm last weekend of summer for most, with mainly sunny skies
    Remnants of Florence expected to approach region into midweek
    Potential for significant rainfall across parts of Atlantic Canada Tuesday/Wednesday

WARM LAST SUMMER WEEKEND -- FOR MOST

Ahead of the dousing the remnants of Florence have in store, much of Atlantic Canada can look forward to a mild -- even unusually warm -- late summer weekend. The area of high pressure that's been deflecting Florence to the south is still in charge over much of eastern Canada, and that will keep skies mainly clear across the Maritimes this weekend, while pumping in warm air and higher humidity from the south. That will have highs nearly 10 degrees above average for some, particularly in Nova Scotia, with humidex readings in the low 30s.

The one exception to this warm spell is likely to be Newfoundland and Labrador, where a cold front drooping down from the north will keep temperatures on the cooler side of seasonal, and bring the risk of a few spotty showers, particularly Saturday night.
RAINY END TO SUMMER?

As that area of high pressure drifts away to the east, it makes way for what's left of Florence to head north into Canada. Giving the storm leftovers a helping hand will be a low pressure system moving across central Ontario and Quebec, and the two working together will likely mean a very rainy midweek for Atlantic Canada.

While it's too early to know the exact track of what has been a very tricky storm, most long range model guidance suggests Atlantic Canada will bear the brunt of Florence's rainfall in Canada, particularly as the storm remnants get swept up by the frontal system to the north, and are once again able to tap into moisture from the ocean.

A lot will depend on the progression of the offshore high pressure, shown above, and how it will steer what's left of Florence, shown in the image above near Washington. Winds out of the south on the left side of that high pressure area will help to push Florence north. If the high is weaker, closer to shore, or further off shore, it will have a significant impact on the track of the remnant low. The northern low, over Quebec, will also play a role.

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #252 on: September 17, 2018, 01:04:43 AM »
Summer's not done yet for us in southwestern Ontario, with 30+°C


Yesterday's September 15 hot and cold spots ...

Hot spot in Nunavut: 7.2 °C  45.0 °F Sanikiluaq

Cold spot in Nunavut: -11.6 °C  11.1 °F Alert

Hot spot in Canada: 31.5 °C  88.7 °F Red Pines, NB

Cold spot in Canada: -11.6 °C  11.1 °F Alert, NU


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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #253 on: September 18, 2018, 01:07:28 AM »
Early start to winter got you feeling down? Environment Canada says there’s still hope for Alberta
By Jennifer Ivanov   

While it's not unusual for Alberta to see snow in September- the recent stretch of cooler weather is starting to take a toll on many people. Albert Delitala reports.

After days of dealing with wet snow and flurries, many Albertans are finding it hard to just keep rolling with the punches.

The early start to winter blanketed much of Alberta earlier this week and hasn’t stopped.

Environment Canada issued a special weather statement on Monday, saying a cool air mass would invade much of Alberta this week, “bringing with it weather that is decidedly more like winter than summer.”

That statement was later upgraded to include a snowfall warning for parts of northern Alberta.

“It’s not the type of pattern that we get every September but it is part of the climatology,” meteorologist Dan Kulak with Environment Canada said. “We do get snow in Alberta in many locations in this month. It is a periodic thing that every few years we get into a situation like this.”

Related

    Recent snowfalls that delayed harvest, damaged crops worry Alberta farmers
    Summer snow in Edmonton means early call for winter clothing donations

    “One of the best things you can do right now is get out and get active,” Farrel Greenspan, registered psychologist, told Global News. “Find a reason to get up, get energized, go out, do something you like or try something new- use your social supports.”

“[The] early on-set of winter has caught people off guard,” Greenspan added. “Anytime you can find a reason to get out and be active, it can help to buffer against Seasonal Affective Disorder or winter blues.

The good news is the forecast for the end of the month may finally give us a taste of the fall we’re all craving.

    “Summer, I think, is certainly behind us,” Kulak added. “That doesn’t mean we’re not going to get some more warmer weather. Through the second half of September and into October, we can have some really nice fall-like days.”

And the forecast is looking promising for those who like a milder winter.

“The forecast we have for the winter for much of western Canada is suggesting milder and dryer than normal thanks to a developing El Niño, which is that warm pool of water off the coast of South America that is modifying weather patterns around the world,” Kulak added.

“That said you can still expect some colder days and some snowy days because we can never escape it altogether.”

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #254 on: September 19, 2018, 01:28:40 AM »
2018 FALL FORECAST | Temperature and Precipitation Outlook
Fall 2018: Early winter or strong summer comeback? See here
FALL FORECAST: Canada's national outlook has a shift coming
Dr. Doug Gillham
Meteorologist, PhD   

Monday, September 17, 2018, 8:55 PM -    After a hot summer, most Canadians have already experienced an early taste of autumnal weather. Does this mean an early winter is in the cards, or will summer weather make a strong comeback like it did last year?

The Weather Network has released their fall forecast for the end of September as well as for the months of October and November. We have also released our preliminary forecast for winter and a look ahead at the remainder of the hurricane season. Please read on for all the details.

"Autumn is a tumultuous season, famous for wild temperature swings and powerful fall storms," said Chris Scott, Chief Meteorologist at The Weather Network. "Of course, this fall will include both, but overall we expect a less active and less tumultuous pattern than normal. This means we'll experience a more gentle slide rather than a freefall, as we make the inevitable transition from summer to winter.”

Most Canadians can expect a mild fall with near normal or above normal temperatures for nearly all of Canada except for parts of Nunavut, northern Quebec and Labrador. The warmest weather relative to normal is expected from the Maritimes to Southern Ontario and across the far western side of the country including B.C., parts of Alberta and the Yukon. In between the back for swings in temperature that are typical of the season should come close to offsetting each other.

Most of the country should see fewer rainy days than normal during the fall, but when storms do occur they will often bring generous amounts of precipitation which should bring many areas to near normal totals for the season.

Here’s a more detailed look at the conditions expected across the country this fall:   

BRITISH COLUMBIA: RAIN AND TEMPERATURE FUTURE WILL DEPEND ON ONE BIG THING
After a rather cool start to the season (so far during September), milder than normal temperatures are expected for the heart of the fall season across British Columbia.

The dominant storm track for much of autumn will be across northern B.C., bringing above normal precipitation to that region. Southern areas will be drier than normal during late September and October, but a wetter pattern during late fall should bring most of the south coast to near normal for the season.

THE PRAIRIES: EARLY SNOW A SIGN OF THINGS TO COME?
The Prairies have experienced a rather abrupt transition from mid-summer heat to chilly, October-like weather. However, the region will settle into a more typical fall pattern for the middle and end of the season, with parts of Alberta tipping to the mild side of normal for the remainder of the season.

That said, it is important to keep in mind that “normal” temperatures drop by more than 2 degrees Celsius per week during the fall across this region. Also, all long-time residents of the Prairie provinces know that significant snow is a normal part of fall.

Drier than normal conditions are expected to persist across southern Alberta, with near to slightly below normal precipitation anticipated elsewhere.

ONTARIO & QUEBEC: IN FOR A TRADITIONAL FALL? TAKE A LOOK BELOW
September has brought a continuation of mid-summer heat and humidity across the region with just a brief taste of fall weather so far. However, unlike last year’s record heat of late September and early October, more typical fall weather is forecast to prevail this year during the final days of September and into October.  A milder than normal pattern is expected to return for late fall (especially November) with fewer fall storms than normal.

While we anticipate fewer than normal rainy days, rainfall totals for the season are still expected to be close to normal due to a few systems that tap into tropical moisture. Peak fall colours will be later than normal this year, but the fall foliage should be much more colourful than last year, except for in areas that were highly impacted by mid-summer drought conditions this year.

ATLANTIC CANADA: 'MILDER' SEASON AHEAD FOR THE ATLANTIC? TAKE A LOOK BELOW
Warmer than normal temperatures are forecast for the Maritimes this fall, but there will still be periods of normal fall weather. Periods of dry weather are expected, but most of the region can still expect near normal precipitation with the potential for localized areas to tip above normal. This is due to the threat for a few storms to tap into tropical moisture and bring excessive rainfall.

THE NORTH: ‘MOST DIVERSE’ FOR NORTHERN CANADA’S FALL - DETAILS BELOW
Milder than normal temperatures are expected across Yukon and parts of the Northwest Territories, while colder than normal temperatures are forecast across much of Nunavut. Above normal precipitation is expected for southern Yukon and into adjacent areas of the Northwest Territories, with near normal precipitation elsewhere.

HURRICANE SEASON UPDATE
After a relatively quiet start to the hurricane season, the first two weeks of September have brought a burst of tropical activity with 5 named storms. A lull in the season is expected during the second half of September but then as we head into early October we have the potential for another active period in the tropics before the season finally shuts down.

One of our greatest concerns continues to be the unusually warm water off the east coast of the United States and Canada. This contributes to more favorable conditions for the systems to develop near the coast (where they pose a greater threat for coming ashore) and this also allows approaching storms to maintain a higher level of intensity as they approach the coast.

PRELIMINARY LOOK AHEAD TO WINTER
With rumors of a developing El Niño, many are asking if the mild fall pattern will continue through the winter.  For those in Western Canada, we do expect a milder than normal winter, but from the central Prairies to Atlantic Canada a more traditional Canadian winter is expected with near normal temperatures. Across this region, we expect the upcoming winter to bear some resemblance to last winter with periods of harsh winter weather that should be offset at times by significant periods of milder weather

Offline PaulMy

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Re: Weather in Canada 2018
« Reply #255 on: September 19, 2018, 11:27:04 PM »
Yesterday's September 18 hot and cold spots ...

Hot spot in Yukon: 16.4 °C  61.5 °F Haines Junction

Cold spot in Yukon: -10.8 °C  12.6 °F Haines Junction

Hot spot in Canada: 29.9 °C  85.8 °F Harrow AAFC, ON

Cold spot in Canada: -18.7 °C  -1.7 °F Alert, NU


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