Author Topic: New Zealand Weather Summary for 1939  (Read 656 times)

Offline Sheldybett

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 97
  • Country: nz
  • Karma: 21
  • Gender: Male
New Zealand Weather Summary for 1939
« on: May 21, 2019, 04:09:51 PM »
SUMMARY OF THE WEATHER FOR 1939.
During the early weeks of the year there were some very heavy rains in the Auckland Provincial District, while January was very cold generally, with severe gales. Dry conditions prevailed, however, in most parts and, winds accentuating the drought, caused a cessation of grass-growth, so that before summer ended there was a rapid decline in the milk-yield. Fogs were unusually numerous and widespread during February.

The autumn season was very mild, with little rain, so that small crops did poorly and sowings were impossible in many places. Autumn weather with unusually mild temperatures was prolonged into June; the winter, on the other hand, was short but exceptionally cold, and remarkable for the amount of snow. During July cold southerly winds prevailed with frequent and widespread hail and snow, even in the North Island. At this period heavy snowfalls in Dunedin resulted in serious disorganizations of city traffic, while deep drifts in Southland and parts of Otago covered sheep for many days, and pastures lay hidden for weeks. Day temperatures were particularly low, one or two inland stations experiencing “ice-days"—i.e., days on which the maximum air temperature failed to rise above freezing-point. In August a record low value for any New Zealand Climatological Station was established when the minimum temperature at Manorburn Dam fell to — 1.5° F (-18.6° C). The winter was fairly wet, especially so during August, heavy rains on the 16th and 17th being followed by serious flooding in the Manawatu district.

The spring quarter was normal as regards temperature, with abundant sunshine. Dry conditions persisted in the first months, but by the end of November soaking rains became fairly general. Wheat crops, which, in Canterbury especially, had suffered considerably, responded satisfactorily to the rain and warmth, while other crops and pastures generally made an outstanding recovery. These rains, however, resulted in flooding in parts of the Marlborough, Nelson, and Westland Provincial Districts.

December, like November, had high humidities. For the country as a whole good pasture-growth was maintained, and, in the North Island, excellent hay and ensilage crops were harvested. Conditions were rather dry for many of She cereal crops, although some of the rains came at an opportune time to help fill the wheat. Two exceptionally wet days were experienced in Wellington—on the 11th December a fall of 6 in. was recorded at Kelburn and severe flooding occurred in the Hutt Valley, and on the 26th torrential rain fell along the southern coast of the province.

For the year as a whole temperatures averaged somewhat less than normal, the coolness being more marked along the west coast. The warmer areas included the Rotorua district, South Canterbury, and Central Otago.

After January, when they were strong generally, winds tended to be lighter than usual, except in Canterbury, where velocities were in excess of the average.

The outstanding feature of 1939 was the dryness over most of the Dominion, several small areas only proving an exception in this respect. The lightness of the rainfall was most pronounced at many South Canterbury stations, where the year's total constituted a new low record. The figures were comparable with those of 1915, when, however, severe drought conditions were common to a far more extensive area. Also, 1915 followed a dry year, but 1939 succeeded an unusually wet one.

The dry autumn, coming as it did after a poor summer season, proved an anxious time for farmers. Pastures made little growth, and the reserves of supplementary fodder were very poor. Spring growth was retarded by the severe winter, especially in the south. In the north conditions became too wet at times, but grass made a good start, so that a satisfactory dairy season with plentiful hay reserves was assured. Apart from losses in the high country due to snow and latent ill-effects of the cold upon ewes, sheep bad a good year. It was, on the whole, a very healthy year for all stock.

NEW ZEALAND OFFICIAL YEAR BOOK, 1941
« Last Edit: May 21, 2019, 04:24:26 PM by Sheldybett »


Sheldybett

Offline Rwood

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1331
  • Country: nz
  • Karma: 244
  • Gender: Male
Re: New Zealand Weather Summary for 1939
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2019, 04:52:37 PM »
NZ's longest rainless spell of 71 days occurred at Wai-iti in Marlborough over February-April. 1939 was also quite a sunny year, and also quite dry as noted above. The exceptional coldness of July has been described in detail in various publications, and Erick Brenstrum wrote a lengthy description of it.


Share via twitter

xx
New Zealand Weather Summary for 1994

Started by Sheldybett

11 Replies
1121 Views
Last post June 26, 2019, 07:36:37 AM
by Rwood
xx
New Zealand Weather Summary for 1940

Started by Sheldybett

1 Replies
572 Views
Last post May 21, 2019, 04:56:24 PM
by Rwood
xx
New Zealand Weather Summary for 1943

Started by Sheldybett

5 Replies
952 Views
Last post May 21, 2019, 08:08:12 PM
by Rwood
xx
New Zealand Weather Summary for 1946

Started by Sheldybett

3 Replies
844 Views
Last post May 22, 2019, 02:10:01 PM
by Rwood
xx
New Zealand Weather Summary for 1949

Started by Sheldybett

3 Replies
752 Views
Last post May 22, 2019, 01:58:09 PM
by Rwood